First Look: Toscano Ristorante Italiano arrives at Atlantic Station

Toscano Ristorante Italiano at Atlantic Station in Midtown has a menu that includes (top row starting from left) Chicken Marsala, rice balls filled with mozzarella and beef, Hunny Pot (cocktail) and porchetta panini; (bottom row from left) Bucatini Carbonara, a meat lover's pizza and Grilled Swordfish. (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Combined ShapeCaption
Toscano Ristorante Italiano at Atlantic Station in Midtown has a menu that includes (top row starting from left) Chicken Marsala, rice balls filled with mozzarella and beef, Hunny Pot (cocktail) and porchetta panini; (bottom row from left) Bucatini Carbonara, a meat lover's pizza and Grilled Swordfish. (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Last week, chef Linda Harrell and the team behind the popular Sandy Springs Italian restaurant Cibo e Beve opened a new restaurant, Toscano Ristorante Italiano, at Atlantic Station in Midtown.

Harrell and her longtime business partner, Gianni Betti, took over the former Meehan’s Public House space on 19th Street, transforming the Irish pub into a casual fine dining destination.

The build-out includes an expanded kitchen and an open dining room, a reconfigured bar and covered patio, and a private dining room. The formal foyer and host stand features a Tuscan-style fleur de lis etched in glass. And much of the art is local, including works from Atlanta artist Stephanie Dalton.

ExploreMore first looks at metro Atlanta restaurants
Combined ShapeCaption
The team at Toscano Ristorante Italiano at Atlantic Station includes (from left) Linda Harrell (one of the owners), John Hults (executive chef) and Irvin Torres (general manager). Not pictured is another owner, Gianni Betti. (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

The team at Toscano Ristorante Italiano at Atlantic Station includes (from left) Linda Harrell (one of the owners), John Hults (executive chef) and Irvin Torres (general manager). Not pictured is another owner, Gianni Betti. (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Combined ShapeCaption
The team at Toscano Ristorante Italiano at Atlantic Station includes (from left) Linda Harrell (one of the owners), John Hults (executive chef) and Irvin Torres (general manager). Not pictured is another owner, Gianni Betti. (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Credit: Chris Hunt

Recently, Harrell sat down at the bar at Toscano, first declaring that she was grateful for all of the loyal regulars at Cibo e Beve, especially during the pandemic.

“You know the neighborhood was so great to us,” Harrell said. “I mean they kept us alive. They really took care of us during the pandemic. We’ve been there 10 years, and we’ve really made friends with most of our guests. They were all here the other night for our friends and family.”

ExploreIntown Atlanta dining news
Combined ShapeCaption
Petto di pollo al Marsala (Chicken Marsala) at Toscano. (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Petto di pollo al Marsala (Chicken Marsala) at Toscano. (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Combined ShapeCaption
Petto di pollo al Marsala (Chicken Marsala) at Toscano. (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Credit: Chris Hunt

Asked to compare and contrast the Cibo menu and the larger Toscano menu, Harrell said Cibo favorites such as the signature chopped salad and the meatballs with San Marzano tomato sauce and ricotta cheese traveled to Midtown with her, but there are several new things, too.

“We think that the menu here is very similar, with the addition of some things that are maybe a little more mainstream, and that we think people would expect or would ask for,” she said. “We have things on the menu here like fettuccine Alfredo and lasagna. Cibo is smaller. The kitchen is smaller and the dining room is smaller, so the menu is smaller, as well.”

ExploreMetro Atlanta restaurant openings
Combined ShapeCaption
Bucatini Carbonara at Toscano. (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Bucatini Carbonara at Toscano. (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Combined ShapeCaption
Bucatini Carbonara at Toscano. (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Credit: Chris Hunt

Another difference at Toscano is that it will be open for lunch and dinner seven days a week, with weekend brunch coming soon.

Combined ShapeCaption
Toscano has a lunch menu. Among its many offerings is Panino con la Porchetta. (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Toscano has a lunch menu. Among its many offerings is Panino con la Porchetta. (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Combined ShapeCaption
Toscano has a lunch menu. Among its many offerings is Panino con la Porchetta. (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Credit: Chris Hunt

“There’s no foot traffic at Cibo for lunch, so lunch is a big difference here,” Harrell said. “But a lot of the menu is the same; there’s just more on the menu here. The meatballs are something we’re really known for, so we had to have those. But it’s funny, they’re called Toscano meatballs here, and Cibo meatballs there, but they’re the same meatballs.”

Combined ShapeCaption
Toscano's antipasto menu includes Arancini di Riso con bufala e manzo (rice balls filled with fresh mozzarella and beef, breaded, fried and served with tomato sauce). (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Toscano's antipasto menu includes Arancini di Riso con bufala e manzo (rice balls filled with fresh mozzarella and beef, breaded, fried and served with tomato sauce). (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Combined ShapeCaption
Toscano's antipasto menu includes Arancini di Riso con bufala e manzo (rice balls filled with fresh mozzarella and beef, breaded, fried and served with tomato sauce). (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Credit: Chris Hunt

Harrell’s younger brother, John Hults, moved from New York to Atlanta in March to work at Cibo and become the executive chef at Toscano. “Trust me, we have some arguments, but he knows how to do everything in the way that it needs to be done,” Harrell said, laughing. “It mirrors Cibo. It really does, and luckily we still love each other.”

Combined ShapeCaption
A popular Cibo e Beve cocktail is also available at Toscano: Hunny Pot (Cathead Honeysuckle Vodka, St. Germain, mint, fresh blood orange juice with a Torresella Prosecco floater). (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

A popular Cibo e Beve cocktail is also available at Toscano: Hunny Pot (Cathead Honeysuckle Vodka, St. Germain, mint, fresh blood orange juice with a Torresella Prosecco floater). (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Combined ShapeCaption
A popular Cibo e Beve cocktail is also available at Toscano: Hunny Pot (Cathead Honeysuckle Vodka, St. Germain, mint, fresh blood orange juice with a Torresella Prosecco floater). (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Credit: Chris Hunt

Another Cibo alum, Toscano general manager Irvin Torres, is in charge of the beverage program, which includes an expanding selection of Italian wines, six draft beers, and several cocktails that have been bestsellers on the Cibo menu. Hunny Pot, with Cathead Honeysuckle Vodka, St. Germain, mint, fresh blood orange juice, and a Torresella Prosecco floater, is currently the most popular, Torres said.

Combined ShapeCaption
Grilled Swordfish with salmoriglio sauce, spinach and roasted potatoes at Toscano. (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Grilled Swordfish with salmoriglio sauce, spinach and roasted potatoes at Toscano. (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Combined ShapeCaption
Grilled Swordfish with salmoriglio sauce, spinach and roasted potatoes at Toscano. (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Credit: Chris Hunt

Summing up a sprawling menu that ranges from salads, soups, sandwiches and pizza, to antipasti, pasta, entrees and dessert, Harrell stresses simplicity and value.

Combined ShapeCaption
Macellaio is a meat lover's pizza at Toscano. (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Macellaio is a meat lover's pizza at Toscano. (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Combined ShapeCaption
Macellaio is a meat lover's pizza at Toscano. (Chris Hunt for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Credit: Chris Hunt

“When you’re coming up as a chef, it’s ‘this looks cool and that looks cool,’ and you want to experiment,” she said. “I had my time when I liked playing with things. Honestly, when it comes down to it, the best food is just simply putting good flavors together.

“Molecular gastronomy was fun. But the tomato sauce that grandma made is always going to be the best. And that’s what I like about our food. We’re not trying to be froufrou about it. We’re just trying to put out good food that everyone will enjoy. And I don’t ever want people to leave feeling hungry. I want people to feel like they got value when they come to our restaurants.”

DINING OUT

11 a.m.-10 p.m. Sundays-Saturdays for lunch and dinner. Brunch coming soon.

232 19th St. NW, Suite 7165, Atlanta. 404-500-5394, toscanoatlanta.com.

Read more stories like this by liking Atlanta Restaurant Scene on Facebook, following @ATLDiningNews on Twitter and @ajcdining on Instagram.