Bully Boy reopens on the Beltline and more dining news from the week

A dish from the menu of Bully Boy. / Courtesy of Bully Boy
Caption
A dish from the menu of Bully Boy. / Courtesy of Bully Boy

Credit: Henri Hollis

Eastside Beltline dining spot Bully Boy has reopened after being closed for more than a year due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The 100-seat restaurant initially opened in late 2019 at 828 Ralph McGill Blvd., adjacent to Two Urban Licks, a fellow Concentrics Restaurants eatery.

The new iteration of Bully Boy features a Japanese kaiseki-inspired menu of shareable plates, entrees and vegan options from Executive Chef Colby Cooper. Dishes include oysters, hamachi kama, grilled octopus and house-made silken tofu. Beverage offerings include a selection of sake, cocktails with Asian components, craft beer and wine.

Bully Boy is open 5-10 p.m. Wednesdays, Thursdays and Sundays and 5-11 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays.

Scoville Hot Chicken has opened a fifth location at 999 Chattahoochee Ave. NW in Atlanta.

The restaurant, which serves Nashville hot chicken sandwiches, available in several spice levels, opened its first location in December, 2020, in Sandy Springs. There also are locations in Athens, Marietta and Buckhead, with one set to open soon in Decatur.

Lucy’s Market is slated to open a second Buckhead location this December at 3200 Howell Mill Road, in the Corso Atlanta senior living community. The 500-square-foot shop will be open for residents and their guests, and will offer gift items, provisions, linens, barware, serving pieces, seasonal items, games and pet accessories.

Rooftop lounge Bar Peri now is open at AC Hotel Atlanta Perimeter Center in Dunwoody.

Located on the seventh floor of the hotel, Bar Peri offers wine, local beer, craft cocktails and a tapas-style menu, with small plates.

The bar, which seats 40 outside and 60 inside, is open 5 p.m.-midnight Wednesdays-Saturdays and 1-8 p.m. Sundays.

The New York Times’ list of the nation’s “most exciting” restaurants, published this week, includes two in metro Atlanta and one with a chef who previously worked in Atlanta.

Midtown restaurant Lyla Lila, which opened down the street from the Fox Theatre in late 2019, serves a European-inspired menu of pastas and other main dishes. The restaurant “has emerged this year as exactly the diverse, sophisticated and comfortable restaurant Atlanta’s booming Midtown neighborhood needed,” according to writer Kim Severson.

Also included on the list were Chai Pani in Decatur, and Southern National in Mobile, Alabama, where Executive Chef Duane Nutter went to work after leaving the lauded One Flew South at Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport.

Bobby Kim, the founder of Breakers Korean BBQ restaurants, is bringing Italian concept Toscana ITA to 5805 Windward Pkwy in Alpharetta, What Now Atlanta reports.

Huey Luey’s Mexican Kitchen and Margarita Bar has closed at 6650 Roswell Road in Sandy Springs, Tomorrow’s News Today reports. Locations of the restaurant, which opened in 2016, remain open in Acworth and Hiram.

Dessert business Sweets by MJB, which currently operates out of food truck park Triton Yards, is set to open a brick-and-mortar location at 1334 Boulevard SE, What Now Atlanta reports.

Longtime Italian restaurant Bambinelli’s is moving its location at 3202 Northlake Pkwy NE about two miles away to 2039 Crescent Centre Boulevard in Atlanta, Tomorrow’s News Today reports. The restaurant also has locations in Midtown, Lilburn and Roswell.

Extreme Teriyaki Grill Express is set to open its eighth metro Atlanta location at 1221 Caroline St., What Now Atlanta reports.

Health-focused chain Original ChopShop is slated to open its first Georgia location at 2274 Peachtree Road, Reporter Newspapers reports. The restaurant, which has locations in Texas and Arizona, has a menu of bowls, salads, sandwiches and juices.

Noodoh Fusion Cuisine is slated to open at 126 Renaissance Pkwy NE, What Now Atlanta reports.

More dining news

G’s Pizza opens in Sandy Springs

Rickshaw Thai Street Food opens in Alpharetta

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