The Clayton County District Attorney’s Office dropped the charges against Migos rapper Offset that stemmed from a 2018 traffic stop.
Photo: Getty Images
Photo: Getty Images

Charges against Migos rapper Offset dropped in Clayton County due to federal probe

Migos rapper Offset will no longer be prosecuted on gun possession, drug and traffic charges stemming from a July 2018 arrest in Jonesboro because there’s a larger federal investigation that’s being conducted, authorities said.

The Clayton County District Attorney’s Office sent AJC.com documents that dismissed all charges against the 27-year-old rapper, whose real name is Kiari Kendrell Cephus, on July 1. However, according to the documents, the district attorney’s office is stepping down at the request of the U.S. Attorney’s Office, which is continuing a “much larger investigation.”

On July 20, 2018, Clayton County police officers were told by agents with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives to look out for two vehicles under their surveillance, the documents said. One of those vehicles was Cephus’ 2014 Porsche 911 Carrera, which also had his bodyguard, Senay Gezahgn, inside.

Rapper Offset (left) and his bodyguard, Senay Gezahgn, were arrested during a traffic stop.
Photo: Clayton County Police Department

The agency asked police to pull over the car and identify everyone inside if they could get possible cause to do so, the documents said. Police previously told AJC.com that the rapper improperly changed lanes at Upper Riverdale Road and Tara Boulevard.

RELATED: Migos rapper Offset arrested in Jonesboro on gun, drug charges

Police also said the vehicle’s tinted windows appeared to violate the law, but a test performed during the traffic stop revealed the tint was within legal limits, the documents said.

Officers said they smelled marijuana from inside the vehicle, and that led to three handguns, less than an ounce of marijuana and more than $107,000 in cash being found by police.

Cephus, a two-time felon, was not supposed to be carrying a gun.

MORE: More charges for Migos rapper ‘Offset’ after fight in jail

Gezahgn, who was also arrested after the incident, will also not be prosecuted in Clayton County, according to the documents.

“The State does not wish to jeopardize an ongoing federal investigation that incorporates the underlying facts in this case and would alert other potential future parties to the investigation and evidence that may support federal charges against such parties,” the documents said.

No details were provided about the federal investigation.

The Clayton County incident was not Cephus’ most recent incident with law enforcement. In April, police charged him with a felony after he was accused of slamming an 18-year-old’s cellphone out of his hands at a Target in Sandy Springs. 

The teenager later changed his mind, with Sandy Springs police telling AJC.com that “all parties involved were able to come to an agreement.” The charge was dropped.

ALSO: Migos rapper Offset cleared in metro Atlanta phone-smacking case

Sandy Springs police dropped a charge of damage to property against Offset.
Photo: Channel 2 Action News

Cephus’ rap group, Migos, consists of himself, his cousin Quavo (real name Quavious Keyate Marshall) and his nephew Takeoff (real name Kirshnik Khari Ball). The trio came out of Lawrenceville and became a huge name in hip-hop music with their 2017 song “Bad and Boujee,” which landed at No. 6 on Billboard’s year-end Hot 100 chart. 

RELATED: A 'Bad and Boujee' Civil War lesson? One metro Atlanta teacher says yes

The trio has had three other Top 10 singles, and Cephus was a featured artist on two other Top 10 songs.

Offset (from left), Takeoff and Quavo of Migos.
Photo: Getty Images

In September 2017, the entertainer made headlines after his secret wedding to rapper Cardi B, whose real name is Belcalis Almanzar. The couple share a daughter, Kulture, and their often tumultuous relationship has kept their marriage in the national spotlight.

MORE: Report: Cardi B and Offset reunite; Offset vows to ‘no groupies’ rule

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