RECIPE: Skirt steak saves time and money

A platter of sliced skirt steak with peppers, onions and garlic in teriyaki sauce is a quick dish that's also easy on your pocketbook.
(Virginia Willis for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Virginia Willis

Credit: Virginia Willis

A platter of sliced skirt steak with peppers, onions and garlic in teriyaki sauce is a quick dish that's also easy on your pocketbook. (Virginia Willis for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

It’s no news that beef prices are through the roof. A 1 1/2 pound bone-in ribeye can easily run $25 at a local grocery store and cost even more at a specialty shop. Instead of serving the iconic steak, try a slightly less expensive cut like a skirt steak.

This lesser-known cut was traditionally one of the cuts the butcher would take home to his family. It has become increasingly available in recent years as stores try to satisfy customer demand for more affordable beef.

You may recognize skirt steak as fajita meat. It is prized for its flavor, rather than for its tenderness. Because the skirt steak is thin, it cooks quickly, and is a fantastic choice for a busy night when you don’t have much time or energy to cook.

Even with a less expensive cut like skirt steak, another way to make your dollar stretch farther is to serve a dish with equal parts beef and vegetables. In this recipe, peppers and onions marry with tangy teriyaki and meaty juices to create a big, bold, beefy-tasting meal with less meat. The hidden bonus is that it’s also better for you, as the portion size is in line with Food and Drug Administration nutritional guidelines.

“Against the grain” is a phrase used when cutting meat. Meat is made of bundles of long muscle fibers aligned parallel to one another. The term “grain” refers to the direction of the muscle fibers. When the muscle fibers are cut parallel to the grain, the meat can be stringy and tough. Some cuts, like the tenderloin, are finely grained and you can’t really tell which way the fibers are aligned. However, skirt steak has visible, thicker fibers and a coarser grain. For the best texture, it is important to cut the skirt steak against the grain, slicing across the short end.

Teriyaki Skirt Steak with Peppers and Onions

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