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Republican Candidates Republican Candidates
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Georgia residents can check their registrations and sign up to vote online through the state’s My Voter Page at mvp.sos.ga.gov. The My Voter Page also includes details about your voting sites, state and federal elected officials and voter participation history.
The deadline to register to vote in Georgia is 29 days before the March 12 presidential primary, on Feb. 12. Three weeks of early voting begins Monday, Feb. 19. Then the general primary for General Assembly and local candidates will be held June 18, and the general election is Nov. 5.
This is the first presidential election under Georgia’s voting law that passed three years ago, which restricted absentee ballot drop boxes, prohibited handing food and drinks to voters waiting in line, shortened deadlines to request absentee ballots and allowed unlimited challenges to voters’ eligibility.
Voters in the presidential primary will be able to choose either a Democratic and Republican ballot. Georgia is an open primary state, meaning any registered voter can pick either party’s ballot.
The Candidates
ajc.com

Nikki Haley
  • Birth date: Jan. 20, 1972
  • Birthplace: Bamberg, South Carolina
  • Party: Republican
  • Alma mater: Clemson University (B.A.)
  • Spouse: Michael Haley
  • Former offices: U.N. ambassador; South Carolina governor; South Carolina state representative
The former Trump U.N. ambassador is the first prominent woman of color to seek the GOP nod for the presidency. The daughter of Indian immigrants who became governor of South Carolina, a key primary state, Haley has rejected being defined by identity politics – whether having to do with her ethnicity or gender – calling that approach “woke self-loathing.” She denies the existence of a glass ceiling despite running to put a “badass woman” in the White House. She wants to talk in a “loving” way about abortion rights, saying she can build a “consensus” on the explosive issue (but is light on specifics). Haley compared finding common ground on abortion to negotiations to remove the Confederate flag from South Carolina State House grounds following a 2015 mass shooting at a historic African American church in Charleston. She also wants politicians over 75 years old to take a mental competency test and suggests President Biden won’t make it through a second term, at the end of which he would be 86.
Where do they stand?
Social Security
Haley has proposed raising the retirement age for people now in their 20s, limiting benefits for the wealthy and using chained CPI, which measures when consumers switch to a less expensive alternative, that would reduce future increases. She has also proposed expanding private Medicare Advantage plans.
Trump tax cuts
Haley supports the 2017 tax cuts.
Trade with China
Haley would bar federal, state and local governments from buying Chinese-made drones; ban the Chinese instant messaging and payment app WeChat and the social media app TikTok; halt exports of technology equipment to China; restrict China from buying U.S. land; and limit scientific and technological cooperation with China. She would consider ending normal trade relations with China over the fentanyl crisis, which has been linked to Mexican criminal groups using precursor chemicals from China.
Banking
Haley criticized the Biden administration for using money from the federal deposit insurance fund for customers of Silicon Valley Bank, calling it a “bailout.” She said depositors should have been paid by selling off the bank’s assets.
Energy
Haley has called for speeding up permitting of oil pipelines, expanding domestic production of oil and natural gas and rolling back “wasteful green energy subsidies and regulations” promoting solar panels and electric vehicles, including new emission standards on cars.
Abortion
At a campaign event in Iowa, Haley gestured away from anti-abortion absolutism — saying that she did not “want unelected judges deciding something this personal.” But her comments were muddled: She said she wanted to leave the issue to the states, but at the same time suggested that she would be open to a federal ban if she thought there was momentum for one. “This is about saving as many babies as we can,” she said, while adding that she did not want to play the “game” of specifying when in pregnancy she believed abortion should be allowed.
Climate change
Haley has acknowledged that climate change is real and caused by humans, but she has generally rejected governmental efforts to reduce emissions. Her advocacy group Stand for America said that “liberal ideas would cost trillions and destroy our economy.” As ambassador to the United Nations during the Trump administration, Haley was closely involved in withdrawing the United States from the Paris Agreement. At the time, she said, “Just because we pulled out of the Paris accord doesn’t mean we don’t believe in climate protection.” But Haley has supported greater use of carbon capture technology to remove carbon from the air.
Border security and immigration
When she was governor of South Carolina, Haley signed a law requiring businesses to use a federal database to check prospective employees’ immigration status, mandating that police officers check the status of some people they stopped for unrelated reasons, and making it a crime to “harbor or transport” an immigrant living in the country without legal permission. She has cited this as a national model, though a judge blocked parts of the law, and the state agreed to soften it. Haley has also said that she wants to restore Trump’s “remain in Mexico” policy, add 25,000 Border Patrol and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents, withhold funding from “sanctuary cities” that limit cooperation with immigration officials, and immediately deport migrants. But she does not support separating families, she said. She wants to limit birthright citizenship. She told CBS News that she wanted legal immigration to be based on “merit” and businesses’ needs.
Ukraine
Haley says that it is “in the best interest of America” for Ukraine to repel Russia’s invasion, and that she would continue sending equipment and ammunition. In a speech at the American Enterprise Institute, she said Biden had been “far too slow and weak in helping Ukraine.”
Washington Post and c.2024 The New York Times
ajc.com

Donald Trump
  • Birth date: June 14, 1946
  • Birthplace: Queens, New York
  • Party: Republican
  • Alma mater: Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania (B.S.)
  • Spouse: Melania Trump
  • Former office/professions: U.S. president; Trump Organization president; author, “The Art of the Deal”; host, “The Apprentice”
Trump is the first sitting or former U.S. president to be indicted, twice. The Justice Department in June 2023 charged Trump with more than three dozen criminal counts for allegedly keeping and hiding classified documents at his Mar-a-Lago Club in Florida. And the Manhattan district attorney in March charged Trump with 34 felony counts of falsifying business record related to allegations he paid hush money to cover up an alleged affair with an adult-film actress. Trump has pleaded not guilty in both cases, and it’s unclear when they’ll go to trial. He was already found liable for defaming journalist E. Jean Carroll over charges he raped her, a verdict he plans to appeal. These aren’t Trump’s only legal troubles. The former president is entangled in a total of six state and federal probes on topics ranging from the Jan. 6, 2021, Capitol riot to interference in the Georgia 2020 presidential election. Nonetheless, Trump still has a strong hold over the GOP primary electorate.
Where do they stand?
Social Security
Although he supported raising the retirement age and privatizing Social Security in the past, Trump broke with Republicans in his 2016 campaign to say that he would not cut benefits. He urged GOP members of Congress to vote against cuts to Social Security or Medicare in the debate earlier this year over raising the debt ceiling.
Trump tax cuts
Trump signed the 2017 tax cuts into law and frequently cites it on the 2024 campaign trail as one of his signature achievements. He has said that he would extend the expiring tax cuts if elected to a second term. The Congressional Budget Office estimates that extending the tax cuts through 2033 would add $3.5 trillion to the federal deficit.
Trade with China
Trump has called for imposing baseline tariffs against Chinese goods, revoking China’s permanent normal trade relations status, phasing out imports of essential goods from China over four years, barring U.S. companies from investing in China, revoking federal contracts from companies that outsource to China, and banning China from buying U.S. farmland.
Banking
Trump signed a 2018 bill that exempted smaller banks from annual stress tests of their assets, which some Democrats argue led to the collapse of Silicon Valley Bank and Signature Bank. He has blamed the failures on high interest rates and environmental, social and corporate governance investing, known as ESG. He has also criticized Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell, despite appointing him to the position.
Energy
Trump has said he would overturn Biden administration policies promoting the domestic production of electric cars. He has also said he would expand domestic oil and gas exploration and production to reduce dependence on foreign oil.
Abortion
More than perhaps any other Republican, Trump is responsible for the current state of abortion access: He appointed three of the six Supreme Court justices who overturned Roe v. Wade and the district judge who invalidated the approval of mifepristone. He has not said whether he would support a national ban on abortion.
Climate change
As president, Trump mocked climate science and championed production of the fossil fuels chiefly responsible for warming the planet. He rolled back more than 100 environmental regulations, mostly aimed at reducing planet-warming emissions and protecting clean air and water; appointed Cabinet members who were openly dismissive of the threat of climate change, including Scott Pruitt as head of the Environmental Protection Agency; and withdrew the United States from the Paris Agreement, under which almost every country had committed to try to limit warming to 2 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels. Trump has given no indication that his approach would be different in a second term.
Border security and immigration
Trump’s administration separated thousands of migrant families — traumatizing children and causing a public outcry. As recently as May, during a CNN event, he did not rule out reinstating that policy. His administration also forced asylum-seekers to remain in Mexico while awaiting hearings, leading to the development of squalid refugee camps, and held children in crowded, unsanitary facilities. While his signature campaign promise in 2016 was to build a border wall, fewer than 500 miles of barriers were built along the nearly 2,000-mile southern border, largely in places that already had them. One of his first actions upon taking office was to ban travelers from several majority-Muslim countries. In 2019, he began denying permanent residency to immigrants deemed likely to require public assistance, a rule that disproportionately affected people from Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia. Congress did not enact his proposals to slash legal immigration by limiting American citizens’ ability to bring in relatives and by adding education and skill requirements, but he cut it drastically in 2020 through pandemic-related actions.
Ukraine
Trump has said that the war in Ukraine is not of vital importance to the United States. In a CNN town hall event, he did not give a straight answer when asked repeatedly whether he would continue to provide military aid, instead declaring that he would end the war “within 24 hours” by meeting with Presidents Vladimir Putin of Russia and Volodymyr Zelenskyy of Ukraine. Trump — who was impeached in 2019 for withholding aid to Ukraine to pressure Zelenskyy to help him electorally — also suggested to Fox News that he could have prevented the war by ceding Ukrainian land to Russia. “I could’ve made a deal to take over something,” he said. “There are certain areas that are Russian-speaking areas, frankly.”
Washington Post and c.2024 The New York Times
Voting Resources
Georgia Secretary of State Website
To access voting information on the Georgia Secretary of State website, users should navigate to the official website and locate the dedicated section for voter resources or elections. Typically, this information can be found under tabs such as "Elections," "Voter Information," or a similar category. Once in the designated section, users may need to input personal details like their name, date of birth, and residential address to retrieve specific information about their voting status, polling location, and ballot details. It's essential to ensure that the website is secure, and users should follow any provided prompts or instructions to access accurate and up-to-date voting information for a seamless and informed civic participation experience.
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