Clark Atlanta, local CEO offer college scholarships to Rayshard Brooks’ children

Rayshard Brooks
Rayshard Brooks

Credit: Family photo

Credit: Family photo

Clark Atlanta University has partnered with the CEO of a popular local restaurant to provide full college scholarships to Rayshard Brooks’ four children.

Brooks, who was fatally shot by police last week following a struggle outside a south Atlanta Wendy’s, had three young daughters and a teenage stepson.

Rayshard Brooks and his family.
Rayshard Brooks and his family.

Credit: Family photo

Credit: Family photo

In a news release, the historically Black university announced it is partnering with Slutty Vegan CEO Aisha “Pinky” Cole and providing more than $600,000 for the children’s college education.

RELATED: Slutty Vegan owner Pinky Cole reveals why she's forever indebted to Atlanta

The scholarships will cover the full cost of tuition and meals, as well as dormitory expenses, a CAU spokeswoman told AJC.com.

“It was without hesitation that we made the decision to partner with our notable alumna and entrepreneur Pinky Cole to help the family and children of Mr. Rayshard Brooks,” Clark Atlanta University President George T. French Jr. said in a statement. “The senseless death of Mr. Brooks will undoubtedly have long-term financial effects on the family and these scholarships will not only provide them with a means to access a world class education, but will help them on their pathway of success.”

Brooks’ death occurred amid national protests calling for an end to racial injustice and police brutality, particularly against Black people. The fatal shooting led to the resignation of Atlanta’s police chief as well criminal charges against the two officers involved.

Garrett Rolfe, who is accused of firing the fatal shots, was terminated one day after the shooting. On Wednesday, he was charged with felony murder and 11 other offenses in connection with the incident.

MORE: Officers charged in Rayshard Brooks' death turn themselves in; 1 out on bond

Cole said she decided to help Brooks’ family after seeing how much pain they were in over his death.

“When you lose someone so close to you, there is a level of momentum that is lost because a piece of you is gone,” she said. “I saw Rayshard’s wife Tomika’s pain, and my heart led me to want to help her and her children ... I wanted to remind her that it takes a village and we are a part of her village.”

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