Little 5 Points Halloween parade going virtual for 2020

Scenes from the Little 5 Points Halloween Festival and Parade in 2018. (Image by Chris Hunt)
Scenes from the Little 5 Points Halloween Festival and Parade in 2018. (Image by Chris Hunt)

Credit: Chris Hunt

Credit: Chris Hunt

The coronavirus pandemic is forcing Atlanta’s most iconic Halloween celebrations to take a break from their usual ghoulish festivities this year.

The quirky Little 5 Points Halloween Parade and Festival announced it is putting on a virtual parade on Oct. 17 at 4 p.m. Organizers asked businesses and residents to send in short videos that will be edited together to form one digital procession, which will air on Facebook.

Throughout the month of October, it will host a “SpookAThon” fundraiser to raise money for the L5P Business Association through raffles and merchandise sales.

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Pre-COVID, the funky neighborhood parade was an annual favorite among locals thanks to its laid-back atmosphere, creative floats and extravagant costumes. It was also the biggest fundraiser for the business association, organizers said.

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Credit: Chris Hunt

The popular Atlanta BeltLine Lantern Parade is also adapting to become a “parade-in-place" this week.

Through Saturday, Sept. 26, residents in Beltline-adjacent neighborhoods are encouraged to “bring your homemade lanterns out to your porch, balcony, yard, and windows to shine your lights.” They can show off their displays by posting pictures to social media with #BeltLineParadeInPlace and including what neighborhood they live in.

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“While we will not get together in person this year, and discourage lantern parade parties or gatherings, your participation from your home will provide a unique way to spread joy across the city, celebrate creativity, and build community on a granular level while keeping Atlanta safe,” according to the event’s website.

The parade began in 2010 and has grown into an event with more than 70,000 participants in recent years carrying illuminated paper creations in the shapes of all kinds.

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