Community Cooks: Big Green Egg works great for smoking ribs

The Raymonds like to smoke their ribs on their Big Green Egg. Courtesy of Coleman Raymond
The Raymonds like to smoke their ribs on their Big Green Egg. Courtesy of Coleman Raymond

Credit: Coleman Raymond

Credit: Coleman Raymond

Coleman and Carson Raymond live in Roswell, and have a 6-month-old baby boy named Chapman. Coleman is in advertising, and she works from home. Carson commutes several days a week, working in development for the Darlington School in Rome.

“I’m fully remote in the home office, and I’m getting my MBA at UGA, and that’s fully remote, as well,” Coleman said.

In addition to working and going to school, she noted that, having a baby during a pandemic was a major challenge, too.

“Literally, the start of my third trimester was when the world shut down,” she said. “I was quarantined big-time, because pregnant women are considered high-risk. But, he’s absolutely perfect, and a joy.”

The Raymonds always have enjoyed cooking together, though that shifted a bit, too, after Chapman was born.

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Coleman and Carson Raymond let ribs sit for a few minutes after being pulled off the grill. Courtesy of Carson Raymond
Coleman and Carson Raymond let ribs sit for a few minutes after being pulled off the grill. Courtesy of Carson Raymond

Credit: Coleman Raymond

Credit: Coleman Raymond

“We experimented a lot, and we tried healthy recipes, and new recipes, but now with a baby, and everything, we don’t really have the luxury of going to the store every day,” Coleman said. “So, it’s more, figure out on Sunday what we’re going to cook for the week, and go to the store once, and also cook to have leftovers.”

A few years ago, the couple inherited a Big Green Egg from Coleman’s father, and they often use it to cook on the weekends.

“We’ve enjoyed experimenting with that,” Coleman said. “We did our Thanksgiving turkey on it last year, and I’m not going to lie, it was pretty spectacular. But, during the week, we do things like homemade pizza in the oven, and pasta dishes. And I love to have a meat and two, like a piece of salmon, a grain, and a veggie.”

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The Raymond family includes Carson (left) Coleman, baby Chapman and their dog, Fontaine. Courtesy of Linda Nichols Photography
The Raymond family includes Carson (left) Coleman, baby Chapman and their dog, Fontaine. Courtesy of Linda Nichols Photography

Credit: Linda Nichols Photography

Credit: Linda Nichols Photography

One of the Big Green Egg recipes the Raymonds perfected is smoked baby back ribs seasoned with a spicy rub and finished with a vinegar sauce for extra zing.

“We started doing them a couple of years ago, and the first try they were great,” Coleman said. “The only tricky part for us was moving to the Big Green Egg, and learning to keep the temperature low and slow. And, we rely on a digital thermometer to tell us when the ribs are ready.”

Baby Back Ribs

A gas grill works great with this rub, but the Raymonds like to smoke ribs on their Big Green Egg. They add apple or hickory wood chips, and use the Big Green Egg ceramic heat shield to block the ribs from the direct heat. They try to keep the grill around 225-250 degrees.

Baby back ribs
  • 1 rack baby back ribs
  • 5 tablespoons of light brown sugar
  • 4 teaspoons of kosher salt
  • 4 teaspoons smoked paprika
  • 1½ teaspoons of black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon of garlic powder
  • ½ teaspoon chili powder
  • ¼ teaspoon onion powder
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cumin
  • ¼ teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 cup vinegar
  • 1 cup water
  • wood chips for smoking
  • In a small bowl, mix together the brown sugar, kosher salt, smoked paprika, black pepper, garlic powder, chili powder, onion powder, ground cumin and dried oregano to make the rub.
  • Make sure to remove the membrane (silver skin) from the ribs first, and cover both sides generously with the rub. If you’re doing two racks, double the rub recipe.
  • Let the ribs sit out on the counter to get close to room temperature, about 20-30 minutes, while you prep the grill.
  • Place the racks directly on the grate of the grill, close the lid, and smoke for about 2 hours, depending on the size of the ribs. Cook until the internal temperature is 190 degrees.
  • Once the ribs are done, briefly immerse them with 1 part water and 1 part vinegar (usually a cup of each per rack) in a baking dish.
  • Let the ribs sit for a few minutes, and then cut, and serve with coleslaw and baked beans. Serves two

Nutritional information

Per serving: Per serving: 381 calories (percent of calories from fat, 56), 28 grams protein, 14 grams carbohydrates, 3 grams fiber, 24 grams total fat (8 grams saturated), 96 milligrams cholesterol, 1,009 milligrams sodium.
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