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Atlanta food halls: Visiting Qommunity in East Atlanta

Quynh “Q” Trinh, the owner of Qommunity, refers to her narrow building in the heart of East Atlanta Village as a “food hallway.”

Indeed, the cozy space is truly a micro food hall, home to just a handful of stalls, with pieces from local artists hanging on the walls, and a few bright red picnic tables and high tops for guests who choose to dine in.

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Credit: Ryan Fleisher

Credit: Ryan Fleisher

Qommunity replaced the very similar Global Grub Collective, which closed in late 2021. The food hall serves as a home for both first-time restaurateurs (Ali Lemma of Ruki’s Kitchen, who left a corporate career to cook the Ethiopian food of his childhood) and more established businesses (Lifting Noodles, Poke Burri).

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Credit: Ryan Fleisher

Credit: Ryan Fleisher

The crown jewel of Qommunity is MikChan’s, a sister restaurant to Cabbagetown’s JenChan’s. Nestled in its own space adjacent to the other stalls, it serves a comfort food menu for breakfast and lunch. Standouts include the Mexican pizza, an elevated version of the Taco Bell classic, and the Mik-fil-A, a worthy homage to the chicken sandwich from the Atlanta-based chain with a name that rhymes. You can wash them down with a rotating lineup of refreshing slushies, including the lush pink bissap, a combination of tart and sweet.

Credit: Ryan Fleisher

Credit: Ryan Fleisher

MikChan’s also offers the banh mi from Trinh’s We Suki Suki, which continues to serve pho and Vietnamese street food.

In the main hall is Ruki’s Kitchen, where the dishes include the sega tibs, with chunks of tender spiced beef complemented by the crunch of sliced onion, garlic and tomato. You can pair it with mesir, a side of red lentils that hit you with a sneaky bit of spice after a few bites.

Credit: Ruki's Kitchen

Credit: Ruki's Kitchen

Elsewhere in the hall, you can get a surprisingly satisfying bowl of 1-Up vegan ramen from Lifting Noodles. You might want to order it with kale noodles, which bring out the umami of the creamy broth.

Credit: Ryan Fleisher

Credit: Ryan Fleisher

Be warned that the eccentricity of Qommunity sometimes can lead to frustration — vendor Carrib x Creole was closed the three times I tried to visit, and a stall listed on the website actually had moved out. But, as long as you keep an eye on Instagram for updates, you’ll be rewarded with dishes that only get more addictive upon return visits.

477 Flat Shoals Ave. SE, Atlanta. 404-901-6992, qommunityeav.com

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