Congresswoman-elect Greene spreads election disinformation on social media

Twitter flagged multiple tweets that Congresswoman-elect Marjorie Taylor Greene posted Wednesday about the election as potentially misleading. Ben Gray for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Credit: Ben Gray

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Twitter flagged multiple tweets that Congresswoman-elect Marjorie Taylor Greene posted Wednesday about the election as potentially misleading. Ben Gray for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Credit: Ben Gray

Marjorie Taylor Greene spent the morning after being elected to Congress falsely accusing Democrats of voter fraud, and Twitter has now labeled multiple posts by her as potentially misleading.

Twitter also flagged similar statements by President Donald Trump, who on Tuesday night and Wednesday morning accused Democrats of trying to steal the election by continuing to count ballots. Government and election officials from both parties have repeatedly said that it will take time to tabulate election results because of the high number of mail-in votes.

Greene and Trump noted that the president’s lead diminished or even disappeared in some states as additional votes were counted. Although there is no evidence of wrongdoing, they labeled it as illegal.

“The Democrats don’t want Americans to know that they were planning on STEALING this election from the beginning,” Greene wrote Wednesday morning on Twitter. She attached a short video of comments made by former Vice President Joe Biden that were taken out of context and edited to misleadingly indicate he planned to win the election by promoting voter fraud.

Twitter added a warning label to that post and others. “Some or all of the content shared in this Tweet is disputed and might be misleading about an election or other civic process," it said.

This is just the latest social media controversy for the congresswoman-elect in Georgia’s 14th District. She has previously spread baseless QAnon conspiracy theories and was widely criticized after videos she posted online surfaced where she made racist, anti-Semitic and anti-Muslim comments.

On Election Day, Greene amplified a misleading tweet that accused poll workers in Philadelphia of illegally posting Democratic campaign material. The local district attorney looked into the claim and labeled the initial post, written by a columnist at the conservative website Newsmax, as “deliberately deceptive.”

That post was ultimately removed so it could no longer be shared, but not before Greene shared it with 140,000 followers.

Most Republican leaders in Georgia have treated Greene with caution. Although many of them opposed her during the runoff because of her problematic social media posts, they rallied behind her once she became the party’s nominee in the 14th District. No members of the party publicly pushed back Wednesday on her posts spreading doubts about the election process.

Greene’s most visible ally in the delegation is U.S. Sen. Kelly Loeffler, who is campaigning in a special election in hopes of retaining her seat and will face the Rev. Raphael Warnock in a January runoff. Loeffler and Greene have both embraced a far-right platform and promoted a die-hard allegiance to Trump.