NEW: Man posing in Nancy Pelosi’s office makes first court appearance

U.S. Capitol rioters who have been identified or arrested. Jake Angeli, who is widely known as the “QAnon Shaman,” has been identified as the man dressed in a Viking headdress during the U.S. Capitol siege on Jan. 6, 2021. He has been spotted in the same costume at other pro-Trump rallies. . A man, pictured far right, sporting his Maryland direct marketing company’s badge in a photo at the Capitol Jan. 6, 2021, has been fired from his job. The Navistar employee has not been named. A woman identified herself as Elizabeth from Knoxville in a viral video amid the unrest. She said she entered the Capitol as a part of a revolution. Richard Barnett, 60, has been identified as the man posted up in House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office. The Arkansas man as since been arrested

Arkansas man 1 of 13 charged in federal court after riots at U.S. Capitol

The man photographed sitting in House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office chair during last week’s Capitol insurrection has made his initial federal court appearance in Arkansas.

Sixty-year-old Richard Barnett of Gravette, Arkansas, appeared before U.S. Magistrate Judge Erin Wiedemann in Fayetteville on Tuesday to hear the charges against him. Among them is a charge that he unlawfully entered a restricted area with a lethal weapon — in this case, a stun gun.

Barnett also is charged with disorderly conduct and theft of public property. If convicted on all charges, including the new lethal weapon count, he could be sentenced to more than 11 years in federal prison.

Barnett’s attorney, Anthony Siano, conceded the validity of the warrant against him. Siano offered no further comment.

Barnett will remain in federal custody at the Washington County Detention Center in Fayetteville until a virtual detention hearing Friday, when a judge will decide whether to grant him bond.

He was one of 13 individuals charged in federal court related to crimes committed at the Capitol.

Several images of rioters scaling the wall, charging Capitol Police officers and one of a protester wearing a Viking headdress have circulated since the violent spectacle at the Capitol. The rioters stormed the legislative chambers during the planned certification of the Electoral College votes. President Donald Trump had incited thousands of attendees at a nearby rally to take to the U.S. Capitol due to his claims of an unjust election of President-elect Joe Biden.

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The chaotic uproar led to five deaths, including a Capitol officer, several injuries and dozens of arrests. The president more than a day later denounced the “heinous” violence and reneged on his previous statements that he would “never concede,” opting instead to vow for a peaceful transfer of power.

Among the many striking images from that day, one photo — of Barnett with a sly smirk, phone in his hand and feet kicked up on Pelosi’s desk — stood out as a reflection of the sentiment of the rioters who in some cases called the insurrection a day of revolution.

Shortly after 1 p.m. Friday, charges were announced for Barnett, including charges of entering and remaining on restricted grounds, violent entry and theft of public property, a U.S. Justice Department official told NBC News. According to the department, he was taken into custody in Arkansas, but it is not clear what Barnett is accused of stealing.

“The lawless destruction of the U.S. Capitol building was an attack against one of our Nation’s greatest institutions,” Acting U.S. Attorney Michael Sherwin said in a statement. “My Office, along with our law enforcement partners at all levels, have been expeditiously working and leveraging every resource to identify, arrest, and begin prosecuting these individuals who took part in the brazen criminal acts at the U.S. Capitol.”

Thirteen individuals were charged with federal crimes. The defendants and charges are outlined below:

  • Cleveland Meredith was charged on Jan. 7, 2021, with making interstate threats to Speaker Nancy Pelosi.
  • Richard Barnett, of Arkansas, was charged on Jan. 7, 2021, with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful entry; violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds; and theft of public money, property, or records. Barnett allegedly entered a restricted are of the Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi.
  • Lonnie Coffman, of Alabama, was charged on Jan. 7, 2021, with possession of an unregistered firearm (destructive device) and carrying a pistol without a license. It is alleged that Coffman’s vehicle contained 11 explosive devices known as Molotov cocktails and firearms. It is further alleged he was in possession of two firearms. Coffman was arrested and is currently being held. His detention hearing is scheduled for Jan. 12, 2021.
  • Mark Leffingwell, was charged on Jan. 7, 2021, with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; assault on a federal law enforcement officer; and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds. Leffingwell allegedly entered the Senate side of the Capitol and when stopped by law enforcement, struck an officer in the helmet and chest. Leffingwell is currently being held and has a detention hearing in district court today.
  • Christopher Alberts, of Maryland, was charged on Jan. 7, 2021, with carrying or having readily accessible, on the grounds of the United States Capitol Building, a firearm and ammunition. Specifically a Taurus G2C, 9mm handgun and 9mm caliber ammunition. The defendant appeared in district court and was released. He has a preliminary hearing scheduled for Jan. 28, 2021.
  • Joshua Pruitt, was charged on Jan. 7, 2021, with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority. The defendant appeared in district court and was released. He has a preliminary hearing scheduled for Jan. 28, 2021.
  • Matthew Council, of Florida, was charged on Jan. 7, 2021, with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds. Council allegedly unlawfully entered the Capitol building, and when stopped by law enforcement, he pushed the officer.
  • Cindy Fitchett, of Virginia, was charged on Jan. 7, 2021, with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; or knowingly, with intent to impede government business or official functions, engaging in disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds; and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.
  • Michael Curzio, of Florida, was charged on Jan. 7, 2021, with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; or knowingly, with intent to impede government business or official functions, engaging in disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds; and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.
  • Douglas Sweet, of Florida, was charged on Jan. 7, 2021, with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; or knowingly, with intent to impede government business or official functions, engaging in disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds; and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.
  • Bradley Ruskelas, of Illinois, was charged on Jan. 7, 2021, with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; or knowingly, with intent to impede government business or official functions, engaging in disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds; and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.
  • Terry Brown, of Pennsylvania, was charged on Jan. 7, 2021, with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; or knowingly, with intent to impede government business or official functions, engaging in disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds; and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.
  • Thomas Gallagher was charged on Jan. 7, 2021, with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; or knowingly, with intent to impede government business or official functions, engaging in disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds; and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

In addition to those arrests, about 40 others were arrested and charged in Superior Court with offenses including, but not limited to, unlawful entry, curfew violations, and firearms-related crimes.

A laptop was stolen from Pelosi’s office during the storming of the Capitol, one of her aides said Friday, according to Reuters. Barnett, who lives in Gravette, Arkansas, reportedly condemned Pelosi for referring to the term “white nationalist” as a derogatory term, according to The Washington Post. The 60-year-old also admitted to taking a letter out of the Democratic Congress member’s office and later stated that the desk was not “her desk, we loaned her that desk and she ain’t appreciating her desk,” according to Barnett’s interview with Arkansas news station 5News.

President Donald Trump on Capitol riots, incoming administration

Barnett shared his tale of what occurred as a result of him and other rioters breaching the federal building and wreaking havoc inside and outside. He told the news station that demonstrators were accosted by tear gas before they entered the building. He also claimed that he was pushed inside the Capitol, where he would later find and retreat in Pelosi’s office.

“I threw my feet up on the desk at that point. I realized some (expletives) had cut me also and I bled on her envelope, so I picked up the envelope and put it in my pocket, and I put a quarter on the desk cause I’m not a thief,” Barnett told 5NEWS.

ExploreFBI seeking public’s help to identify rioters who sieged Capitol

Several Arkansas representatives in D.C., including Rep. Steve Womack, R-Russellville, and Bruce Westerman, R-Hot Springs, have come together to unanimously take a stance against the violent actions taken by Trump’s supporters Wednesday.

As of Thursday, police had made more than 80 arrests and released images of 26 other “persons of interest” wanted for unlawful entry to the Capitol. A number of reported attendees have not been arrested but have lost their jobs.

A Texas lawyer, Paul Davis, lost his job at Goosehead Insurance after posting on social media about his attendance, according to CNN. A man sporting his Maryland direct marketing company’s badge in a photo at the Capitol has also been terminated.

The employee, right from center, was one of many supporters of President Donald Trump who was confronted by Capitol Police officers outside the Senate Chamber on Wednesday. The Navistar employee was later fired. (Manuel Balce Ceneta/ AP Photo)
The employee, right from center, was one of many supporters of President Donald Trump who was confronted by Capitol Police officers outside the Senate Chamber on Wednesday. The Navistar employee was later fired. (Manuel Balce Ceneta/ AP Photo)

Credit: Manuel Balce Ceneta

Credit: Manuel Balce Ceneta

Before his arrest, Barnett said he did not fear the prospect of facing charges due to the U.S. Capitol siege.

“Am I scared? Hell, no. But, yeah, there’s a possibility. I didn’t do anything. I didn’t breach the doors. I got shoved in. I didn’t mean to be there. Hell. I was walking around looking for a bathroom,” he told the news station.

The FBI called on the public Thursday to offer tips and digital media that would show the violence that occurred during the rioting at the Capitol and around Washington, D.C. Those who witnessed unlawful violent action during the uproar Wednesday are asked to fill out an online form with information, photos or videos with relevant insight to fbi.gov/USCapitol.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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