Mercedes-Benz Stadium to host mega-site, can test 2K for COVID-19 a day

Registered nurse Kelli Clayton administers a COVID-19 vaccine during an event Saturday morning, Jan. 16, 2021, for Fulton County School employees and their spouses who are 65 and older at Mercedes-Benz Stadium. (Photo: Ben Gray for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Ben Gray

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Registered nurse Kelli Clayton administers a COVID-19 vaccine during an event Saturday morning, Jan. 16, 2021, for Fulton County School employees and their spouses who are 65 and older at Mercedes-Benz Stadium. (Photo: Ben Gray for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Ben Gray

Fulton County on Friday will be home to a COVID-19 testing mega-site with a daily capacity of 2,000 people.

Georgia Department of Public Health announced Thursday that the site will be hosted at Mercedes-Benz Stadium. The stadium was home to a massive site supplied by the Federal Emergency Management Agency that administered 300,000 doses the first half of last year.

The drive-up site will be located at the Home Depot Backyard, 1 Backyard Way.

This new operation will be open every day except Tuesday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily until further notice. These PCR tests are free to all Georgians, but insurance will be billed if available.

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State officials last week announced two more mega-sites in the metro area: one at Jim Miller Park (Gate 1) at 1295 Al Bishop Drive in Marietta and another at 2994 Turner Hill Road in Stonecrest.

These new sites come as the shortage of access to at-home tests continues and the omicron variant spreads.

Appointments are strongly encouraged and can be made online at https://viralsolutionsga.com/register.

ExploreComplete coverage of COVID-19 in Georgia

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New study suggests , T cells could lead , to universal COVID vaccine.Newsweek reports that a new study suggests that immune system T cells from previous illnesses could help defend people against COVID-19. .The research could lead to a new generation of potential vaccines. .The study was conducted at the Imperial College London under lead author Dr. Rhia Kundu. .Another senior author of the study, professor Ajit Lalvani, said that a new type of vaccine using T cells could prevent infection from current and future variants of COVID. .Our study provides the clearest evidence to date that T cells induced by common cold coronaviruses play a protective role against SARS-CoV-2 infection, Professor Ajit Lalvani, director of the NIHR Respiratory Infections Health Protection Research Unit at Imperial College London, via BBC.However, Kundu and others have cautioned that while the study showed promising results, people should still get vaccinated now.While this is an important discovery, it is only one form of protection, and I would stress that no one should rely on this alone. Instead, the best way to protect yourself against COVID-19 is to be fully vaccinated, including getting your booster dose, Dr. Rhia Kundu, Imperial College London press release, via BBC.Newsweek explains that T cells are a form of white blood cells and are a critical part of the immune system. .T cells reportedly provide protection by attacking proteins within the COVID-19 virus. .The journal, Nature Communications published the study, on Jan. 10

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