Atlanta’s mayor-elect asked the public for ‘quick fixes’ the city should tackle. Here’s what you suggested

Then-mayoral candidate Andre Dickens campaigns at the Sweet Auburn Curb Market on Saturday, November 20, 2021. (Miguel Martinez for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Miguel Martinez for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Credit: Miguel Martinez for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Then-mayoral candidate Andre Dickens campaigns at the Sweet Auburn Curb Market on Saturday, November 20, 2021. (Miguel Martinez for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Last week, Andre Dickens, Atlanta’s incoming mayor, took to social media with a question for the people who just elected him to lead the city.

Dickens, who is set to take office Monday, wanted to hear the public’s ideas for “quick fixes” his administration can tackle in the first few months of 2022.

“It’s important to talk directly to the citizens of Atlanta about what they want to see solved in our great city,” Dickens wrote. “As my team is planning the transition, what are some quick fixes (3 months or less) we can tackle? Use the hashtag #AskingAtlanta and let me know!”

Dickens has already set an ambitious agenda — both short- and long-term — for his tenure as mayor. Some of his immediate goals include stopping the Buckhead cityhood movement, hiring more officers and speeding up the city’s procurement process.

In response to the mayor-elect’s question, Atlantans had a wide range of topics and ideas they want to see the city tackle. A few caught our eye:

Many of the suggestions revolved around safety for pedestrians and cyclists, installing “Complete Streets” designs and paving potholes:

David Alman suggested lowering speed limits in residential and other busy areas, and installing more pop-up bike lanes.

There was an idea for a pothole patrol program:

Lexi Blevins had a request that should resonate with many Atlanta drivers: “Can we get the metal plates replaced with actual pavement pretty please?”

Some of the suggestions were simple pleas for road repaving, from Cascade to Howell Mill:

Some of the ideas revolved around the pandemic, including instituting stricter vaccine mandates and offering free KN95 masks at community centers and libraries.

Some other suggestions ran the gamut:

One user said the city should explore noise reduction options around the interstate and Ga. 400 in the Lindbergh area.

On Instagram, someone said the city should put more garbage cans on the streets to reduce trash.

Nathan Clubb, a former City Council candidate, said Dickens should fix the management at the troubled city-run Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS program, and find a way to implement quick infrastructure projects with an in-house team.

Several people on Twitter urged Dickens to stop the plan to build a police and fire training center on forested, city-owned land in DeKalb County, but that’s a step the mayor-elect is unlikely to take. Dickens was among the council members who voted in support of the plan when it was approved in September.

Dickens hasn’t said whether he plans to adopt any of the ideas, but thanked the public for them on Friday, saying: “You all have some great suggestions! Together, we’ll move Atlanta forward.”

He is set to be sworn in as the city’s 61st mayor on Monday, Jan. 3 at Georgia Tech’s Bobby Dodd Stadium, following a weekend of inauguration celebration events.

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