Actual Factual Georgia: Comic strip about the Okefenokee swamp

An alligator is seen from the Owls Roost Tower in Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in Folkston. The refuge is a 438-acre federally protected area that is home to hundreds of species of vertebrates, including more than 200 varieties of birds and 60 kinds of reptiles that live in the swamp. HYOSUB SHIN / HYOSUB.SHIN@AJC.COM

Credit: Hyosub Shin / Hyosub.Shin@ajc.com

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An alligator is seen from the Owls Roost Tower in Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in Folkston. The refuge is a 438-acre federally protected area that is home to hundreds of species of vertebrates, including more than 200 varieties of birds and 60 kinds of reptiles that live in the swamp. HYOSUB SHIN / HYOSUB.SHIN@AJC.COM

Credit: Hyosub Shin / Hyosub.Shin@ajc.com

Credit: Hyosub Shin / Hyosub.Shin@ajc.com

Q: Wasn’t there a comic strip many years ago that was set in the Okefenokee Swamp and featured a bunch of animals? What was the name of that strip?

A: Pogo Possum and his backwoods buddies were the stars of "Pogo," a syndicated comic strip by Walt Kelly that was published in newspapers from 1948-75.

Kelly used Pogo, Albert Alligator and Porky Pine, naturally a porcupine, and many other Okefenokee residents to poke fun at national figures and satirically comment on social and political issues. The cartoon sparked books, songs and an animated movie.

Learn more about Walt Kelly and Pogo from ConnecticutHistory.org.