Don’t fall for these bathroom renovation ripoffs.

Getting a return on investment is harder than you may think

As home prices start to drop around the country in response to rising mortgage rates, many home sellers are looking for ways to increase their property values. Renovating for a return on investment can be a tricky thing, however. Many big renovation projects never make their money back.

Here are a few examples of bathroom projects that probably won’t pay for themselves when you sell.

Stay away from high-tech gadgets

According to Anton Giuroiu, an architect and interior designer and the co-founder of Homesthetics, going high-tech is not a road home sellers should travel down

“Outfitting your bathroom with too many high-tech gadgets can be a turnoff for potential buyers down the line, and lead to higher utility bills today,” he told Realtor.com. “The cost of these devices can also add up quickly, so be selective about which ones you really need. Essentials like a programmable thermostat and energy-efficient lighting won’t go out of style.”

ExploreWelcome to the $13.8m ‘Birthday Cake Castle’ mansion

Nicer is not always better

Daniela Andreevska, vice president of content for Mashvisor, said that making your bathroom too luxurious can actually harm your home’s value.

“One renovation that reduces a home’s value related to the bathroom is making it too luxurious, especially if the property is on the lower price range and the renovated bathroom does not match the overall home style,” he told Go Bank Rates. “Luxury bathrooms with expensive tiles, dark colors and a freestanding bath can be great, but they belong to spacious, traditional, luxurious properties. But redesigning the bathroom of a relatively small, modern, affordable home is a huge mistake.”

ExploreHGTV-featured Atlanta interior designer turns fashion model’s home into work of art

Don’t get that steam shower

A steam shower sounds like a wonderful buzzword for a house listing, but that is simply not the case. And with an average cost around $12,000 price tag, it’s unlikely you’ll recoup your investment.

“A steam shower is a popular, high-end home improvement that doesn’t deliver a return on investment,” Christina Duffy, designer and project director at Freemodel, told Realtor.com. “There are exceptions in larger luxury homes with space to create actual steam rooms. But for most homeowners, it’s expensive to plan and install, and the footprint of the space doesn’t make it worth the investment. The whole idea is to create a place to relax, and that’s hard to do in a normal-size shower.”