Metro Atlanta’s best nursing homes, according to U.S. News

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Exercise may reduce , risk of dementia, study says.Working up a sweat is sometimes the best medicine for your body.A recent study finds that exercise may also protect your brain from dementia.According to CNN, the study, published in 'Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association,' .found that exercise can increase protein levels that strengthen communication between brain cells via synapses.Synapses are the critical communicating junctions between nerve cells and are really where the magic happens when it comes to cognition, Kaitlin Casaletto, assistant professor of neurology at the University of California San Francisco, via CNN.All of our thinking and memory occur as a result of these synaptic communications. , Kaitlin Casaletto, assistant professor of neurology at the University of California San Francisco, via CNN.Past research had found that physical activity reduced the risk of dementia, but nobody knew why.I think these findings begin to support the dynamic nature of the brain in response to our activities, Kaitlin Casaletto, assistant professor of neurology at the University of California San Francisco, via CNN.... and the capacity of the elderly brain to mount healthy responses to activity even into the oldest ages. , Kaitlin Casaletto, assistant professor of neurology at the University of California San Francisco, via CNN.... and the capacity of the elderly brain to mount healthy responses to activity even into the oldest ages. , Kaitlin Casaletto, assistant professor of neurology at the University of California San Francisco, via CNN.The study found that those who move more often have higher amounts of protective proteins in their body.The more physical activity, the higher the synaptic protein levels in brain tissue. , Kaitlin Casaletto, assistant professor of neurology at the University of California San Francisco, via CNN.Every movement counts when it comes to brain health. , Kaitlin Casaletto, assistant professor of neurology at the University of California San Francisco, via CNN

With 108 nursing homes in the metro, there are plenty to choose from

Nursing home care is important, so don’t just take your aging loved one to the nearest home. Here is a guide to the best nursing homes in metro Atlanta, as ranked by U.S. News.

More than 15,000 facilities were evaluated by U.S. News for both short- and long-term care, which are each ranked separately.

“To be recognized as one of the 2021-22 U.S. News Best Nursing Homes, a facility must have been ‘High Performing’ in short-term rehabilitation, long-term care or both,” the organization said on its website. “Prior to staff COVID-19 vaccination rates and other restrictions, 3,401 (22%) met those criteria out of the 15,298 nursing homes evaluated by U.S. News, of which 2,612 facilities were High Performing in short-term rehabilitation, 1,878 facilities were High Performing in long-term care and 1,089 were High Performing in both.”

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Northside Gwinnett Extended Care Center earned the Best Nursing Living label from U.S. News, while Ansley Park Health and Rehabilitation holds the top spot as the highest rated facility in the entire Peach State.

While A.G. Rhodes Home Wesley Woods, Budd Terrace at Wesley Woods and Manor Care Rehabilitation Center received high praise for their short-term care, U.S. News rated the facilities as average when it comes to long-term care.

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