According to a new study, hugging it out can help women de-stress

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According to a New Study, Hugging it Out Can Help Women Destress.Women who get a hug from their partner when they’re stressed have a decreased level of cortisol.Cortisol has a major impact on our bodies as it affects memory, weight gain, muscle weakness, and other health problems.The men in the study didn't show the same results. .Experts say this could be for a number of reasons, one being the results could've been very low ,that it didn't register.Here are some great ways to help your partner move past their stress and onto happiness:.Ask them what they need from you.Actively listen.Get out and do something fun and active together.Know their love language and act accordingly

With all that’s going on in the world, sometimes you just need a hug. Of course, a hug does wonders when you’re in an emotional state, but when that state is stressful — for women, at least — a hug does wonders. As for men? Not so much.

A new study suggests that women who get a hug from their partner when they’re stressed show decreased levels of cortisol. Cortisol has a major impact on our bodies as it affects memory, weight gain, muscle weakness and other health problems.

When we receive affection from someone we love, we release oxytocin — aka the love hormone — which happily fights to reduce cortisol levels. Experts say the release of this happy hormone and the emotional support from loved ones is a great combination for defeating stress.

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The study of 76 participants, all of whom were in relationships with other study participants, revealed that only the women showed an increase in oxytocin. As for why the men didn’t benefit as much from this study, experts are still examining the possibilities.

Some suggest the societal pressures of showing affection and the male persona, while others say there’s a major difference in physical receptors in men’s and women’s biological makeup.

“Just because we did not find the effect in men, (doesn’t mean) that it is not there,” said senior study author Julian Packheiser, a postdoctoral researcher with the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, in an interview “The effect could simply be smaller and was just undetected.”

While the study showed an overall low level of oxytocin among the male participants, there’s no denying that your partner might experience sympathy symptoms like abdominal pain and discomfort, aches in the body and teeth, bloating, depression, and anxiety.

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If your partner is struggling with stress, experts say there are right and wrong ways to go about helping them decompress and de-stress. The wrong way is trying to be “the fixer.”

“Stress could mean that your partner is feeling overwhelmed, but it can also be an indication that their body is looking to release some pent-up emotions,” said Sherianna Boyle, emotional wellness expert and author, in an interview with Bustle. “Avoid fixing or attempting to make your partner ‘feel better.’ The less we judge, criticize, or intervene, the more likely our partner will loosen up some of this emotional baggage.”

Here are a few great ways to help your partner move past their stress and onto happiness:

  • Ask them what they need from you
  • Listen actively
  • Get out and do something fun and active together
  • Know their love language and act accordingly

Helping your partner take a few deep breaths is a great way to show support and understanding — while opening the door for a deeper connection.