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The life and legacy of John Lewis

FILE - In this Dec. 6, 2019 file photo, Civil rights leader Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., is hugged as House Democrats gathered before passing the Voting Rights Advancement Act to eliminate potential state and local voter suppression laws, at the Capitol in Washington. At right is Rep. Terri Sewell, D-Ala., who introduced the bill and who represents Selma, Ala., a city that was at the forefront of the 1960s civil rights movement. They are joined at far right by Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt. Mourning the death of civil rights hero John Lewis, Democrats are urging the Senate to take up a bill of enduring importance to Lewis throughout his life: protecting and expanding the right to vote.  Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Majority Whip Jim Clyburn and other Democrats say the Senate should take up a House-passed bill to restore key sections of the 1965 Voting Rights Act and rename it for Lewis.  Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell called Lewis a “great man” who helped bend the nation’s history toward justice, but Republicans appear unlikely to bring up the voting rights bill for a Senate vote. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
FILE - In this Dec. 6, 2019 file photo, Civil rights leader Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., is hugged as House Democrats gathered before passing the Voting Rights Advancement Act to eliminate potential state and local voter suppression laws, at the Capitol in Washington. At right is Rep. Terri Sewell, D-Ala., who introduced the bill and who represents Selma, Ala., a city that was at the forefront of the 1960s civil rights movement. They are joined at far right by Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt. Mourning the death of civil rights hero John Lewis, Democrats are urging the Senate to take up a bill of enduring importance to Lewis throughout his life: protecting and expanding the right to vote. Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Majority Whip Jim Clyburn and other Democrats say the Senate should take up a House-passed bill to restore key sections of the 1965 Voting Rights Act and rename it for Lewis. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell called Lewis a “great man” who helped bend the nation’s history toward justice, but Republicans appear unlikely to bring up the voting rights bill for a Senate vote. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Credit: J. Scott Applewhite

Credit: J. Scott Applewhite

A look back at the life of the civil rights leader and congressman

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In this episode of the Politically Georgia podcast, the AJC’s Washington correspondent Tia Mitchell serves as guest host. Mitchell and AJC race and culture reporter Ernie Suggs discuss the life and legacy of U.S. Rep. John Lewis, who passed away on July 17 at the age of 80.

Mitchell and Suggs discuss: His childhood, family, role in the civil rights movement - which ranges from sit-ins, his speech at the March on Washington, his role and ousting of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and more - as well as his time on the Atlanta City Council and the 1986 race against his friend Julian Bond. The episode ends with a discussion of Lewis’ legacy and why he was named the “conscience of congress.”

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