A recent study says moderate consumption of alcohol can raise your cancer risk. Researchers found a strong correlation between alcohol and cancer. They found the correlation held regardless of the type of drink. The scientists suggested implementing a higher tax on alcohol.

Non-drinkers have higher combined mortality, cancer risk than light drinkers, study says

Drinking is associated with several health issues, including hypertension and liver disease. However, those who consume liquor may outlive those who don’t, according to a new report. 

» RELATED: Even one drink per day can increase your risk of cancer, study warns

Researchers from Queen’s Belfast University in Northern Ireland recently conducted a study, published in in the journal PLOS Medicine, to explore mortality and cancer risks among drinkers and non-drinkers. 

To do so, they reviewed data from the US Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, which examined nearly 100,000 adults in America between 1993 and 2001.

The participants, aged 55 to 74, completed a diet history questionnaire, which listed their alcohol consumption, and were followed up with after about nine years. Analysts also took note of their cancer diagnoses from medical records. 

After analyzing the results, they found that the average lifetime alcohol intake for adults was about 1.78 drinks per week. At a closer look, they discovered that men drank about 4.02 drinks weekly and women drank about 0.80 weekly. 

» RELATED: Non-drinkers more likely to miss work than moderate drinkers, study says

They revealed that heavy drinkers or those who have more than three drinks a day have the highest death and cancer risks. However, they found that a person’s combined risk of dying younger or developing cancer is lowest among light drinkers or those have one to three drinks a week.

In fact, light drinkers have a lower combined risk of overall mortality or cancer compared to those who never drink, their research revealed.  

“We had expected light drinkers to be at a similar combined risk to never drinkers, so the reduced risk in light drinkers was surprising,” coauthor Andrew Kunzmann told CNN. “The reasons for the reduced risk in light drinkers compared to never drinkers are still open to debate amongst the scientific community.”

The authors did point out a few limitations. They said they only assessed older adults. Plus, the information they received was self-reported, and they also did not factor in other risk factors for cancer. However, they believe their findings are still strong. 

“This study,” the team wrote, “provides further insight into the complex relationship between alcohol consumption, cancer incidence, and disease mortality and may help inform public health guidelines.”

» RELATED: This is how much beer Georgians consumed in 2017

Support real journalism. Support local journalism. Subscribe to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution today. See offers.

Your subscription to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution funds in-depth reporting and investigations that keep you informed. Thank you for supporting real journalism.

Related Stories

X