Use time at home to take free Ivy League courses online

The following 13 classes will help teach you the skills you need for the modern workforce Job Interview Skills Training Course HTML Introduction to Spreadsheets and Models Learning Web Analytics Conversational Spanish Made Easy Learn Adobe Illustrator from Scratch Marketing in a Digital World Successful Negotiation: Essential Strategies and Skills Complete Guide to Drafting a Business Plan Report Writing Made Simple Introduction to Video Editing Secret Sauce of Great Writing The Complete Presentation and

There are hundreds of courses from Harvard, Columbia, Yale and more

Staying at home all day, every day, for a couple of weeks can seem like a punishment, but health experts say social distance is vital to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

Why not put your time to good use and learn something from an Ivy League school? The best part is the courses are free.

There are hundreds of MOOCs — massive open online courses — available from all eight Ivy League schools you can take either at the specified time or at your own pace.

All of these have a short video attached so you can see what the class will be like.

Here are just a few:

ExploreBuddhism and Modern Psychology

This six-week course begins Monday, March 16, and requires about five hours a week. It will examine how Buddhism is faring in light of evolutionary psychology.

This class is from Princeton and provided by Coursera, an education platform that partners with universities and organizations worldwide.

ExploreThe Civil War and Reconstruction – 1865-1890: The Unfinished Revolution

This self-paced course requires six to eight hours a week for 15 weeks. After a discussion on how historians’ views on this period, the class will focus on issues still relevant today: “Who is an American citizen and what are citizens’ rights; what is the relationship between political and economic freedom; which has the primary responsibility for protecting Americans’ rights — the federal or state governments”; and more.

This class is from Columbia University via edX.

ExploreBuilding High-Performing Teams

This five-week course begins Monday, March 16, and offers a certificate of completion to purchase. This class guides you through “creating the ground rules and structure needed to set your team up for success. You gain the skills to diagnose issues such as conflicts, groupthink and lack of commitment in your team before they get out of control.”

This class is from University of Pennsylvania via Coursera.

ExploreScience & Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to Soft Matter Science (part 1)

This self-paced class is five-seven hours a week for six weeks. During each module of this course, chefs reveal the secrets behind some of their most famous culinary creations — often right in their own restaurants. Inspired by such cooking mastery, the Harvard team will then explain the science behind the recipe.

This class is from Harvard via edX.

ExplorePyramids of Giza: Ancient Egyptian Art and Archaeology

This self-paced class is two-four hours a week for eight weeks. This introductory course will explore the art, archaeology and history surrounding the Giza Pyramids. You will learn about Egyptian pharaohs and high officials, follow in the footsteps of 20th-century expeditions, and discover how cutting-edge digital tools such as 3D-modeling are reshaping the discipline of Egyptology.

This class is from Harvard via edX.

ExploreFind Your Calling: Career Transition Principles for Returning Veterans

If you need help adjusting to work life after the military, this course “will focus on the development of interpersonal, intrapersonal, and intellectual character strengths as they relate to making a successful career transition.”

“The skills you learned in the military will go a long way toward helping you succeed in the civilian workforce, but if you’re looking for some extra guidance in figuring out what to do next for a career – and ultimately a new way to serve – then you’ll find it in this course.”

This self-paced class is one to three hours a week for six weeks. It is from Columbia University via edX.

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