A Daily Glass of Soda or Juice Can Increase Your Risk of Cancer According to a new French study that looked at more than 100,000 people, sugary drinks are linked to an increased risk of cancer. They found that a 100 ml sugary drink per day led to a 18% increase in overall cancer risk and a 22% increase in breast cancer risk. The study participants were 79% women and 21% men. The observational study was conducted over a nine-year period. Sugary drink consumption was self-reported by participants through th

Study: Just one sugary drink a day can increase risk of cardiovascular disease

Another study concludes that just one sugary drink a day can increase your risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

Last year, researchers in France found even one small glass of soda or sugary juice can increase your chances of getting cancer or having heart problems.

» Study finds sugary drinks linked to higher risk of early death, especially for women

Now, in a study published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, California researchers have found one serving daily of a sugary soft drink is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease.

Sugar-sweetened beverages were defined as “caloric soft drinks, sweetened bottled waters or teas, and fruit drinks.”

For their study, the scientists questioned 106.178 women free from cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus in the California Teachers Study, a cohort of female teachers and administrators who have been followed since 1995. 

The women were questioned for 20 years to determine beverage consumption and whether they had been diagnosed with heart disease, stroke or diabetes. during those two decades, many of the women began showing signs of those conditions.

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The study found that women who daily consumed fruit drinks with sugar added — "fruit drink" excluded fruit juices and included only flavored fruity drinks with added sugar  — were 42% more likely to develop cardiovascular disease compared with those who drank no sugary beverages. Frequent soda drinkers had less risk, with a 23% greater likelihood for cardiovascular disease overall.

The American Heart Association advises no added sugar for children younger than age 2, no more than 100 calories from added sugar a day for children older than age 2 and most women, and no more than 150 calories from added sugar a day for most men. That's about 6 teaspoons, or 24 grams, of sugar for children older than age 2 and women, and 9 teaspoons or, 36 grams, of sugar for men. 

According to the Mayo Clinic, 1 teaspoon of sugar (which equals about 4 grams) has about 16 calories. A 12-ounce can of regular soda has about 160 calories — about 10 teaspoons, or 40 grams, of sugar.

"We hypothesize that sugar may increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases in several ways," said lead author Cheryl Anderson, a professor of family and public health at University of California San Diego.

"It raises glucose levels and insulin concentrations in the blood, which may increase appetite and lead to obesity, a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease."

In addition, she said, excessive sugar is associated with inflammation, insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes.

To avoid consuming too much added sugar, the American Heart Association recommends reading labels. Many foods — not just beverages — have sugar added, so checking labels can help keep amounts in check.

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