Portable stove makes it easy to cook after trekking trails

Portable stove can cook real meals

When planning your camping meals, don’t limit yourself to cold sandwiches or hot dogs from a makeshift grill. Camp Chef’s Everest High Pressure Two-Burner Stove is a portable yet high-powered piece of equipment every camper should consider adding to his or her arsenal. With two 20,000 BTU burners, it’s not a hand warmer like many camping stoves. It can cook real meals — and fast.

It has a matchless ignition system, so there’s no need to fiddle with matches, and it has a three-sided wind barrier to ensure the flame doesn’t extinguish in the open air. Sturdy heat-control dials allow users to adjust heat from low to high.

The Everest’s construction is as solid as its performance. It has a nickel-coated steel cooking grate for strength and corrosion resistance, as well as a stainless steel drip tray for quick cleanup.

It’s also made for portability. Relatively lightweight and compact at 12 pounds and 13.5 x 23.5 x 4 inches, it’s hinged and includes a metal latch for closure that’s considerably more durable than its plastic counterparts. Once it’s latched shut, you can grab the side handle and carry the stove anywhere.

The unit includes a regular adapter for a 1-pound propane cylinder and a one-year warranty.

Price is $121. Available at REI, Dick’s Sporting Goods and Amazon.com. Visit campchef.com for a list of local retailers.

Shelby Sheehan-Bernard, McClatchy-Tribune

Trail map apps point you in the right direction

4 Points has you covered if you forget your trail maps, or just want to check out the trail systems in Boise, McCall, Sun Valley or Stanley (and Bend and Portland, Oregon, too).

The maps are available $1.99 each, and they are available for iOS and Android phones.

The maps work in conjunction with your phone’s GPS, so you can find your route along the trails. You can also get a 3-D view of the trails and get elevations profiles, and the app provides information about each trail, including length and elevation change.

The apps work without cell coverage or wi-fi, and a simple blue dot lets you know where you are at all times for easy navigation.

They’re handy and inexpensive, so the maps are well worth the price.

Check them out at: http://trailweb.net/

Roger Phillips, The Idaho Statesman

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