Taylor Foundation celebrates its 50th anniversary

040316 ROSWELL, GA: Names and dates line the voluminous records at the Church of Latter Day Saints Family History Center, where people come to research their family's genealogy. Family History Center at 500 Norcross Street in Roswell. For Helen Cauley feature on Geneaology - Family Trees. (Parker C. Smith/Special)
040316 ROSWELL, GA: Names and dates line the voluminous records at the Church of Latter Day Saints Family History Center, where people come to research their family's genealogy. Family History Center at 500 Norcross Street in Roswell. For Helen Cauley feature on Geneaology - Family Trees. (Parker C. Smith/Special)

Credit: Special

Credit: Special

The R.J. Taylor Jr. Foundation, started to provide funding for people or institutions to publish genealogical records, celebrates its 50th anniversary this year.

The foundation is a Georgia treasure. Taylor, who lived from 1892-1984 in Macon and Atlanta, created it in August 1971. He had a deep interest in genealogy and wanted to provide grants to pay for the publishing of genealogical records, primarily concerning people who lived in Georgia prior to 1851.

While the foundation began by underwriting the publication of traditional books, it has expanded into grants for records in digital format. Two significant grantees are the Georgia Archives for the Virtual Vault and the Digital Library of Georgia for its Georgia Historic Newspapers. Both projects allow the public to look up information online at no charge.

Those interested in applying for a grant must meet certain foundation standards. If an author/compiler receives funding, the foundation pays to publish several hundred copies of said work, which the author may sell. The publications have gone to more than 40 libraries and archives in Georgia and around the United States. The foundation is seeking more libraries in which to place books. Its website has information for interested libraries. To apply for a grant or to get more information on the foundation, go to taylorfoundation.org. Georgians are very fortunate that Taylor had the vision to create this unique institution that provides more access to Georgia records.

Georgia’s historic theaters lecture topic

Leigh Burns, director of the Fox Theatre Institute of Atlanta, will speak virtually on March 12 at the Lunch and Learn Lecture on the Georgia Archives website. She will discuss the institute and Georgia’s historic theaters. To join in, check GeorgiaArchives.org, its Facebook page, or https://tinyurl.com/yxabmete .

Contact Kenneth H. Thomas Jr., P.O. Box 901, Decatur, Ga., 30031 or kenthomasongenealogy.com.

In Other News