Black Friday 2020: Free pet adoptions in metro Atlanta

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Show your furry friends a little TLC with these 13 ways to spoil your pet.

The adoptions are offered through Monday

If you’re looking for a furry friend to keep you company through the rest of the pandemic and beyond, a promotion from LifeLine Animal Project may be the best way to get one.

The managing organization of Fulton County Animal Services and the DeKalb County Animal Services began hosting the Black Friday Adopt-a-thon, Foster Pet Edition on Nov. 23 and it will continue through Monday, Nov. 30.

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“Black Friday shopping will look a little different this year, but the love of a pet remains unchanged,” the description read online. “To keep our community safe and avoid large crowds at our shelters, we are waiving adoption fees for all pets in foster homes! Take advantage of the best deal in town this holiday season and feel great about doing it.”

Sponsored by the Petco Foundation, potential adopters can visit the LifeLine Animal Project website to sort through the dozens of cats and dogs they would like to take home from a foster pet parent. Those interested can filter through the listings based on species, size, sex and age. To submit an adoption inquiry, click the “Adopt Me” button on the animal’s profile.

In order to adopt a pet, adopters must be 18 years or older and present a valid ID. They’ll also be asked to complete a questionnaire and meet with an adoption counselor. While meet and greets with pets who are already in the home are not required, they are encouraged as they can help adopters learn if a potential new addition is a good fit for their family.

When the pet is adopted, they’ll be spayed or neutered, vaccinated and microchipped.

ExploreWhy fostering a shelter animal during coronavirus crisis helps you and them

Getting a pet can be beneficial at any time, but amid the coronavirus pandemic, it can especially help lessen the impact on already overcrowded animal shelters.

“In times like these, shelters are going to be absolutely swamped with a tremendous number of pets,” Robin Ganzert, president and CEO of the nonprofit American Humane, told the Today show earlier this year. “We have to be able to provide safety valves for those shelters to release some of their populations into fostering homes. … Truly, we are in a major crisis for animal shelters and for rescue groups.”

Since many pets are already in foster homes, the next step is to get the animals into permanent homes.

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