Some radio stations are banning Michael Jackson’s music after ‘Leaving Neverland’

Radio Stations Drop Michael Jackson's Music After 'Leaving Neverland' Documentary The HBO documentary details alleged abuse by the late pop star. A Canadian company responded by pulling Jackson's music from over two dozen radio stations. Christine Dicaire Cogeco Media, via statement Radio stations in New Zealand also responded by removing the singer's music from their airwaves. The documentary focuses on two men who claim they were abused by Jackson on his Neverland Ranch. Jackson's family has denounced

Radio stations are grappling with how to handle allegations of pedophilia against Michael Jackson in the new documentary “Leaving Neverland.”

Three Montreal radio stations have pulled Michael Jackson's music from the air, according to City News 1130. The decision comes after the airing of the HBO documentary , which aired earlier this week, shares the stories of two men who allege Jackson groomed them for sex and molested them when they were children.

"We are attentive to listeners’ comments, and last night’s documentary created reactions,” a spokeswoman for the stations said.

She said the decision will apply to the company’s 23 radio stations.

» 'Leaving Neverland': 5 things to know about the Michael Jackson documentary

Media companies in New Zealand did the same Wednesday, according to report by Complex.

“We aren’t deciding whether Michael Jackson is guilty of pedophilia or not,” said content director Leon Wratt. “We’re just merely trying to make sure that our radio stations are going to play the music that people want to hear.”

The BBC also denied a report that BBC Radio 2 had quietly dropped Jackson.

Canadian radio company Corus Radio told CBC it has no current plans to pull the songs, but is "monitoring the situation closely."

Wedding DJs told Slate they have seen some requests not to play Jackson or R. Kelly, but the King of Pop is still a fixture of reception playlists.

» 'Leaving Neverland' trailer paints dark picture of Michael Jackson

The subjects in “Leaving Neverland,” James Safechuck and Wade Robson, had previously denied Jackson sexually abused them. However, they said they decided to come out with their stories of abuse after having their own children and the singer’s death.

Reviews have called the documentary "devastating and credible." It has forced many of Jackson's fans, who span the world, to rethink their relationship with the King of Pop.

Jackson is one of the most successful entertainers ever. He has sold more than 350 million albums. His public career spanned four decades. He died on June 25, 2009, of cardiac arrest. He was 50.

"Leaving Neverland" is streaming now on HBO.

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