Cardi B Trademarks 'Okurrr'

Cardi B fires back at Jermaine Dupri for his ‘strippers rapping’ comments

Jermaine Dupri recently made some comments about the newest wave of female rappers, and Cardi B didn’t like what he had to say. 

» RELATED: Here's how Twitter responded when Jermaine Dupri said Nipsey Hussle was Jesus

During a recent interview with People TV, the Atlanta native was asked to share his favorite lady emcees. While he named Megan Thee Stallion, Nicki Minaj, and Cardi B, he admitted he was having trouble with his list. 

“I can’t really say. The only reason why I can’t say is because I feel they’re all rapping about the same things,” he said. “I don’t think they’re showing us who’s the best rapper. I think they're trying to show⁠—for me, it's like strippers rapping ... At some point, somebody's going to have to break out of that mold and just show us⁠—talk about other things, just rap about other things besides that.”

Cardi B wasn’t a fan of his response and took to Instagram to share her thoughts. She began by explaining many of her fans enjoy her sexual lyrics. When she attempted to switch up the topic with her single “Be Careful,” which is about a broken relationship, she said listeners weren’t as supportive. 

“When I did ‘Be Careful’ people was talking mad (expletive) in the beginning like ‘What the (expletive) is this?’ ‘This is not what I was expecting,’” she said in the Instagram video

In another Instagram video, she then blamed bloggers for not writing about female rappers who do not typically have sexualized lyrics. She highlighted Rapsody, Tierra Whack, Oranicuhh and Kamaiyah. 

“I feel we need to put these girls in more magazines and blogs. Radio DJs play these girls,” she said.

Cardi B wasn’t the only person who disagreed with Dupri’s remarks. Folks headed to Twitter to express their opinions on the topic, and the music producer became a trending topic for much of Friday. 

Several said Dupri is out of touch. Many even slammed him for not calling out male rappers who don’t diversify their lyrics.

Others accused him of misogyny. 

Some challenged him to sign female rappers who cover other topics in their music. 

And a few agreed with the hip-hop mogul. They said he was right but needed to criticize the entire rap genre. 

» RELATED: Jermaine Dupri reflects on So So Def 25th anniversary ahead

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About the Author

Najja Parker
Najja Parker
Najja Parker is a writer and online content producer for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
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