China setting and furniture on display at the FDR Memorial Museum, part of Roosevelt's Little White House state historic site in Warm Springs, Ga. The china on display is Royal Copenhagen of Denmark. New York Gov. Franklin D. Roosevelt used these pieces while he stayed at his first cottage in Warm Springs known today as the McCarthy Cottage. credit: Holly Steel / hsteel@ajc.com

Discover 3 Georgia sites for history buffs

Roosevelt’s Little White House Historic Site

Former President Franklin Delano Roosevelt first discovered Warm Springs in the 1920s, hoping the 88-degree spring water would help with his polio. In 1932, a year before becoming president, Roosevelt built what would be called the Little White House in Warm Springs. Today, guests can tour FDR’s digs, which have been preserved to look as they did when he was alive, including the pools complex. In April 1945, FDR was posing for a portrait at the Little White House and had a stroke that would ultimately claim his life. The unfinished artwork and other memorabilia, including Roosevelt’s 1938 Ford convertible, can be seen in the museum.

401 Little White House Road, Warm Springs. 706-655-5870, gastateparks.org/LittleWhiteHouse.

Dahlonega

The site of America’s first gold rush continues to shimmer with appeal for mountain-loving vacationers. Visitors often stake a claim at the Dahlonega Gold Museum Historic Site. See where the digging took place as guides take guests 200 feet underground for a tour of the old Consolidated Gold Mines. Dahlonega’s downtown square serves as a hub for dining and shopping. Other attractions, such as nearby Amicalola Falls, several wineries and vineyards, and annual festivals lure travelers. The latter includes the Bear on the Square Mountain Festival (April 16-17), a celebration of bluegrass music and Appalachian culture.

Dahlonega-Lumpkin County Chamber & Visitors Bureau, 13 S. Park St., Dahlonega. 1-800-231-5543, dahlonega.org.

Andalusia Farm

Literary buffs can explore the former home of the late author Flannery O’Connor. The estate of more than 500 acres includes the main house where O’Connor lived and penned “Wise Blood” and the rest of her published work. Explore the peafowl aviary, the tenant farmer house, cow barn, horse stable, pump house and more. Special events take place throughout the year, including an art exhibition running through April 3. “The Light By Which We See” illuminates work by 11 artists inspired by O’Connor’s writings. The 12th annual Bluegrass Festival is set for Nov. 5.

2628 N. Columbia St., Milledgeville. 478-454-4029, andalusiafarm.org.

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