Q&A about Georgia Tech’s football attendance plan

October 24, 2015 Atlanta - Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets and Florida State Seminoles take on the field before their game at Bobby Dodd Stadium on Saturday, October 24, 2015. HYOSUB SHIN / HSHIN@AJC.COM

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October 24, 2015 Atlanta - Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets and Florida State Seminoles take on the field before their game at Bobby Dodd Stadium on Saturday, October 24, 2015. HYOSUB SHIN / HSHIN@AJC.COM

Georgia Tech announced its plans for fan attendance at football home games Wednesday, notably limiting attendance for the six games at Bobby Dodd Stadium to 20% of its 55,000-seat capacity.

As for what that will look like and other changes that COVID-19 has rendered for fans planning to cheer in person for the Yellow Jackets, here are answers to a number of questions.

Q: How will the priority for ticket purchasing be determined?

A: Season-ticket holders will have first priority, and that group will be ordered by Alexander-Tharpe Fund priority points. The next group after season-ticket holders is purchasers of the Stinger Mobile Pass holders. If tickets are still available, single-game tickets will be made available.

Fans will be able to purchase tickets in clusters generally ranging from two to eight seats. The clusters will be arranged throughout the stadium bowl. The process of selecting seats for season-ticket holders who have opted in for the season begins next Wednesday.

Q: Will fans have to wear masks?

A: Yes, with a couple of exceptions. Fans 2 years old and up will be required to wear masks inside the stadium’s perimeter and are strongly encouraged to wear them at all times throughout campus.

Fans can remove their masks to eat or drink, but they must do so while at their seat, or, for fans in club areas, at a designated area. In suites, it will be the suite owners’ prerogative to enforce social-distancing orders.

Tech used precise language in describing the masks that will be required – at least two layers of breathable material, fully covering nose and mouth and secure under the chin, a snug but comfortable fit against the side of the face and not needing to be held in place by one’s hands.

Q: Will Yellow Jacket Alley continue?

A: The players’ walk down Brittain Drive from the team buses to the locker room, a favorite for many fans to support team members up close, will be discontinued for this year on the guidance of public-health officials. So will the marching band’s pregame show on Callaway Plaza and the other pregame festivities held on the plaza and Peters Parking Deck.

Q: What about tailgating?

A: Tailgating will be permitted, although the news release cautioned that “social-distancing guidelines apply to institute-controlled parking areas.”

Q: What are other ACC schools doing?

A: Most have not released their plans. Florida State, where Tech will open the season Sept. 12, is planning to limit attendance at Doak Campbell Stadium to 20-25% of capacity.

Virginia Tech athletic director Whit Babcock said recently that “we’ll likely be minimal fans, if any,” according to the Athletic. As part of Virginia’s reopening, sports venues can presently accommodate up to 1,000 patrons.

Syracuse, where Tech is to play Sept. 26, is under plans to have no fans at games. Boston College, where Tech will play Oct. 24, had determined that it would hold its Sept. 12 season opener without fans, although that game has been canceled because the opponent (Ohio) will not play football this fall.

Q: What about the marching band?

A: By ACC rule, marching bands and cheerleaders are not permitted on the field. A tweet from the band’s account Tuesday night said that “we can’t wait to share some of the awesome things we have planned for this fall with you all!”

Q: There’s going to be alcohol sold?

A: Actually, yes. In a first in Tech history, alcohol will be sold in the general seating areas. The decision to open sales throughout the stadium follows the successful execution of a pilot program conducted at Tech baseball games in the spring.

Previously, alcohol was sold only in premium seating areas.

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