5 Bulldogs broke color barrier at Georgia

Credit: pskinner@ajc.com

Credit: pskinner@ajc.com

In 1971, 10 years after the university integrated, five freshmen were the first African-American football players to break the color barrier at Georgia.

Richard Appleby, wide receiver; Horace King, running back; Chuck Kinnebrew, defensive lineman; Clarence Pope, linebacker; and Larry West, defensive back. The accomplishments by the five scholarship athletes set milestones at Georgia.

King became the first African-American to score a touchdown for Georgia’s varsity team. Four years later, he became the first African-American from Georgia drafted by the NFL. Appleby was part of one of the famous plays in Georgia history — his 80-yard end-around pass to Gene Washington beat Florida in 1975.

Their stories are among the hundreds highlighted in an exhibit at the College Football Hall of Fame — open through May — called “The Blood, Sweat and Tears,” telling the story of integration in college football.

Explore2021: University of Georgia honors The Five on the 50th anniversary of integration

There are 231 and 13 Black coaches inducted into the Atlanta hall. Before Herschel Walker or Champ Bailey, these five Bulldogs paved the way:

GEORGIA

Richard Appleby, wide receiver from 1971-74, one of the first African-Americans to play at Georgia

Horace King, running back from 1971-74, one of the first African-Americans to play at Georgia

Chuck Kinnebrew, defensive lineman from 1971-74, one of the first African-Americans to play at Georgia

Clarence Pope, linebacker from 1971-74, one of the first African-Americans to play at Georgia

Larry West, defensive back from 1971-74, one of the first African-Americans to play at Georgia