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Credit: pskinner@ajc.com

Credit: pskinner@ajc.com

Thanks to Atlanta mayor for rooting out corruption

I wish to publicly commend new Atlanta Mayor Andre Dickens for his statement of action regarding discovery of seeming corruption of some city employees.

Several individuals’ recent federal trial (and conviction) proved their theft of money from taxpayers regarding contracts for work performed for the city. Recently, Atlanta fired a few more highly salaried people who were reportedly involved in the bribery scheme.

Mayor Dickens stated in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, “… .we’re going to operate this government with integrity, and the people depend on it. We are looking at every practice that we have to make sure that it’s done the right way.”

Corruption is harmful in ways beyond counting. Graft in government agencies steals money from taxpayers for greedy individuals. Greed is somewhat “a disease” that is not cured by feeding it - it only grows larger! A selfish few have harmed a poorer many (by costs of living) of our population. Thank you, Mayor Dickens, for turning a corner toward a better Atlanta. Your constituents greatly need it!

TOM STREETS, ATLANTA

Integrity vital for trust; there’s no substitute

There’s no substitute for integrity. Whether it is the Supreme Court, the Catholic Church, a scouting organization, someone involved in the opioid crisis, a political party, or any relationship, we must rely on and trust each other.

I am not sure integrity can be taught — you either are genuine or you are not. The Marine Corps has an interesting way of demonstrating integrity. You never ask your troops to do something you would not do. They know that -- from the first moment they met you and you walked around, so the sun was in your face when you addressed them, and not in their faces. You did not eat until they all ate first. So when you ask them to jump backward off a cliff (rappelling), they will do it because they just saw you do it first.

There is no substitute for integrity.

DANIEL F. KIRK, KENNESAW