What bills passed and failed at the Georgia Capitol?

March 29, 2018 - Atlanta, Ga: Jared Williams, right, throws a large pile of paper in the air next to his father, Sen. Michael Williams, R-Cumming, left, as Sine Die was proclaimed shortly after midnight during Legislative Day 40 in the Senate Chamber at the Georgia State Capitol Thursday, March 29, 2018, in Atlanta. PHOTO / JASON GETZ

Credit: Jason Getz

caption arrowCaption
March 29, 2018 - Atlanta, Ga: Jared Williams, right, throws a large pile of paper in the air next to his father, Sen. Michael Williams, R-Cumming, left, as Sine Die was proclaimed shortly after midnight during Legislative Day 40 in the Senate Chamber at the Georgia State Capitol Thursday, March 29, 2018, in Atlanta. PHOTO / JASON GETZ

Credit: Jason Getz

Credit: Jason Getz

From major transportation initiatives to rural internet programs, Georgia lawmakers gave final approval to dozens of bills before Thursday’s conclusion of this year’s legislative session.

Many other proposals didn’t make the cut, including election measures and an immigration enforcement bill.

Here’s a look at what legislation passed and fell short by the time the Georgia General Assembly adjourned shortly after midnight Friday morning:

PASSED

  • The foundation for a dramatic expansion of mass transit in metro Atlanta.
  • A ban on talking on your phone while driving unless you use a hands-free device.
  • Sales taxes on online retail sales.
  • Rural internet expansion by setting up a structure for future government funding.
  • Fully funding the state's portion of k-12 public education formula.
  • Medical marijuana for patients who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder.
  • A new city of Eagle's Landing created in part from the existing city of Stockbridge.
  • Allowing local governments to effectively ban fireworks except on holidays.
  • Permitting domestic violence victims to break their leases without a penalty.
  • Renaming Runaway Negro Creek on Skidaway Island to Freedom Creek.
  • Dedicated funding to protect green space in Georgia.
  • Letting big winners of the Georgia Lottery to remain anonymous.
  • Policies to prevent heckling of speakers on public college campuses.
  • Making it free for Georgians to freeze their credit reports.
  • An increase in tax credit scholarships for private schools.
  • More money for charter schools.
  • A ban on computer snooping without permission.
  • Lower bail costs for defendants who can't afford to pay.
  • Reducing Georgia's 6 percent income tax rate.
  • Making it easier to adopt children.
  • Alcohol sales in restaurants beginning at 11 a.m. on Sundays instead of 12:30 p.m.

FAILED

  • Replacing Georgia's electronic voting machines with a paper-based system.
  • Requirements for prosecutors and police to determine whether defendants are in the country illegally.
  • Letting more adult survivors of child sex abuse file lawsuits against predators.
  • Limiting early voting on Sundays and forcing polls to close in the city of Atlanta an hour earlier, at 7 p.m. as in the rest of the state.
  • Keeping guns from Georgians with mental illnesses.
  • Allowing religious adoption agencies to turn away gay couples.
  • Regulation of daily fantasy sports.
  • Higher pensions for state legislators.

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