How Georgia’s new voting machines work

Credit: Alyssa Pointer and Tyson Horne

The new voting system uses touchscreens, printed-out paper ballots and ballot scanners.

Credit: Alyssa Pointer and Tyson Horne

New voting computers are being rolled out to all in-person Georgia voters in the state’s June 9 primary, adding a paper ballot to elections for the first time in 18 years.

The voting equipment uses touchscreens that are similar to what voters are familiar with.

But unlike Georgia's previous voting system the touchscreens don't store votes. Instead, they're connected to printers that create paper paper ballots, providing a way to check electronic results after years of complaints of alleged voting irregularities and security issues.

Voters will have the opportunity to check their printed-out paper ballots before depositing them into ballot scanners. Then ballots will be preserved in locked ballot boxes.

RELATED: New Georgia voting machines cause lines and problems on Election Day

Here’s how the voting system works:

1. Check-in

09/16/2019 -- Atlanta, Georgia -- Voters check in at their precincts with an iPad that scans their driver's license or other form of photo ID when using the new Georgia voting machines at the James H. "Sloppy" Floyd building in Atlanta, Monday, September 16, 2019. (Alyssa Pointer/alyssa.pointer@ajc.com)
09/16/2019 -- Atlanta, Georgia -- Voters check in at their precincts with an iPad that scans their driver's license or other form of photo ID when using the new Georgia voting machines at the James H. "Sloppy" Floyd building in Atlanta, Monday, September 16, 2019. (Alyssa Pointer/alyssa.pointer@ajc.com)

Credit: Alyssa Pointer

Credit: Alyssa Pointer

Voters check in at their precincts with an iPad that scans their driver’s license or another form of photo ID. Then voters can use their fingers to sign in on the screen.

2. Vote

09/16/2019 -- Atlanta, Georgia -- The new Georgia voting machine at the James H. "Sloppy" Floyd building in Atlanta, Monday, September 16, 2019. A 21.5-inch touchscreen displays a ballot that voters can use to make their choices for candidates. The touchscreen, called a ballot marking device, includes accessibility options such as enlarged text and a brail touchpad. (Alyssa Pointer/alyssa.pointer@ajc.com)
09/16/2019 -- Atlanta, Georgia -- The new Georgia voting machine at the James H. "Sloppy" Floyd building in Atlanta, Monday, September 16, 2019. A 21.5-inch touchscreen displays a ballot that voters can use to make their choices for candidates. The touchscreen, called a ballot marking device, includes accessibility options such as enlarged text and a brail touchpad. (Alyssa Pointer/alyssa.pointer@ajc.com)

Credit: Alyssa Pointer

Credit: Alyssa Pointer

A 21.5-inch touchscreen displays candidates and referendums. Voters make their choices on the touchscreen, called a ballot marking device, which includes accessibility options such as enlarged text and headphones.

3. Review choices

09/16/2019 -- Atlanta, Georgia --An informative box is displayed ballot making box before a voter can print their ballot at the James H. "Sloppy" Floyd building in Atlanta, Monday, September 16, 2019.  Chris Harvey, director of elections division for the Georgia Secretary of State, and Scott Tucker, customer relations manger for Dominion Voting, gave a demonstration of the new Georgia voting machines. (Alyssa Pointer/alyssa.pointer@ajc.com)
09/16/2019 -- Atlanta, Georgia --An informative box is displayed ballot making box before a voter can print their ballot at the James H. "Sloppy" Floyd building in Atlanta, Monday, September 16, 2019. Chris Harvey, director of elections division for the Georgia Secretary of State, and Scott Tucker, customer relations manger for Dominion Voting, gave a demonstration of the new Georgia voting machines. (Alyssa Pointer/alyssa.pointer@ajc.com)

Credit: Alyssa Pointer

Credit: Alyssa Pointer

Voters can choose to review the candidates they selected on the screen or print out their ballot

4. Print ballot

09/16/2019 -- Atlanta, Georgia -- Breanna Thomas, Election liaison for the Georgia Secretary of State, uses the new Georgia voting machines at the James H. "Sloppy" Floyd building in Atlanta, Monday, September 16, 2019. (Alyssa Pointer/alyssa.pointer@ajc.com)
09/16/2019 -- Atlanta, Georgia -- Breanna Thomas, Election liaison for the Georgia Secretary of State, uses the new Georgia voting machines at the James H. "Sloppy" Floyd building in Atlanta, Monday, September 16, 2019. (Alyssa Pointer/alyssa.pointer@ajc.com)

Credit: Alyssa Pointer

Credit: Alyssa Pointer

Next to the touchscreen, a printer produces a paper ballot.

5. Check printed ballot

09/16/2019 -- Atlanta, Georgia -- Breanna Thomas, Election liaison for the Georgia Secretary of State, looks over her ballot after using the new Georgia voting machine at the James H. "Sloppy" Floyd building in Atlanta, Monday, September 16, 2019. Next to the touchscreen, an HP printer creates a paper ballot. The ballot includes a text listing of voters' choices along with a bar code that can be read by an optical scanning machine. Voters can review their choices for accuracy and request a new ballot if needed. (Alyssa Pointer/alyssa.pointer@ajc.com)
09/16/2019 -- Atlanta, Georgia -- Breanna Thomas, Election liaison for the Georgia Secretary of State, looks over her ballot after using the new Georgia voting machine at the James H. "Sloppy" Floyd building in Atlanta, Monday, September 16, 2019. Next to the touchscreen, an HP printer creates a paper ballot. The ballot includes a text listing of voters' choices along with a bar code that can be read by an optical scanning machine. Voters can review their choices for accuracy and request a new ballot if needed. (Alyssa Pointer/alyssa.pointer@ajc.com)

Credit: Alyssa Pointer

Credit: Alyssa Pointer

The ballot includes a text listing of voters’ choices along with a bar code that can be read by an optical scanning machine. Voters can review their choices and request a new ballot if needed.

6. Scan

09/16/2019 -- Atlanta, Georgia -- Chris Harvey, director of elections division for the Georgia Secretary of State, shows off the new Georgia voting machines during a demonstration at the James H. "Sloppy" Floyd building in Atlanta, Monday, September 16, 2019. (Alyssa Pointer/alyssa.pointer@ajc.com)
09/16/2019 -- Atlanta, Georgia -- Chris Harvey, director of elections division for the Georgia Secretary of State, shows off the new Georgia voting machines during a demonstration at the James H. "Sloppy" Floyd building in Atlanta, Monday, September 16, 2019. (Alyssa Pointer/alyssa.pointer@ajc.com)

Credit: Alyssa Pointer

Credit: Alyssa Pointer

The ballot is inserted into the scanner for vote tabulation. Ballots will be accepted whether they’re face-up or face-down, forward or backward. The scanner is position on top of a black ballot box that can later be unlocked for recounts or audits.