Makeup artist accused of blackface for turning white woman into black one

BERLIN, GERMANY - JANUARY 19:  Make-up equipment is seen backstage ahead of the   Kilian Kerner show during the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Berlin Autumn/Winter 2015/16 at Kosmos on January 19, 2015 in Berlin, Germany.  (Photo by Steffen Kugler/Getty Images for Kilian Kerner)

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BERLIN, GERMANY - JANUARY 19: Make-up equipment is seen backstage ahead of the Kilian Kerner show during the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Berlin Autumn/Winter 2015/16 at Kosmos on January 19, 2015 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Steffen Kugler/Getty Images for Kilian Kerner)

Many consider makeup an art form, but one cosmetologist is catching fire for a creation that some are calling blackface.

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A makeup artist took to Instagram to post a side-by-side photo of a white woman he'd transformed into a black one. The left image showed a bare-faced Caucasian model, while the left one was of the same model wearing foundation shades darker than her complexion and a head wrap.

The user wrote a lengthy caption to comment on the look.

“DISCLAIMER. I want to clearly express the sincere place I am coming from with this transformation...THIS IS NOT ABOUT A RACE CHANGE. This is about one woman acknowledging, embracing, and celebrating the beauty of another woman’s culture,” he said.

While an explanation was offered, many took to social media to express their angst, accusing the artist of blackface.

📞Hello Paintdatface ..... WOC called and we want our MELANIN back 😡 #appropration #blackface #BlackGirlsAreMagic @LegendaryRootz pic.twitter.com/jRFaSlxzXG— FancyFallonMua (@fancyfallonmua) May 28, 2017
📚 (@SheilaPThatsMe) May 28, 2017

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A few questioned the cosmetologist’s intention, wondering why he didn’t use a person of color to celebrate black culture.

🌕🌖🌗🌘🌑🌒🌓🌔🌕 (@ArtsyPoet) May 28, 2017

However, there were others who didn’t see an issue.

🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆 (@IVGuerraFelix) May 28, 2017

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The backlash caused the artist to delete the posts, but he did not issue an apology and continued to defend his choice.

“Although I am saddened by how many people are angered, I can't offer an apology for my artwork and for what I find to be beautiful. The transformation came from a place of love,” he said.

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