Día De Los Muertos (Day of the Dead in English) is one of the world’s most misunderstood holidays. Simply because it’s celebrated within range of Halloween, and features an assortment of macabre imagery and costumes, some people assume it’s just “Mexican Halloween.” The multi-day holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died, and help support their spiritual journey. The Day of the Dead is often celebrated with ofrenda, altars hono
Photo: Courtesy the City of Roswell
Photo: Courtesy the City of Roswell

Roswell to hold first Día de los Muertos parade — with tequila, mariachi

If you can’t make the 1,350 miles trip to Mexico City, Roswell is holding its first Día de los Muertos festival and parade.

The Day of the Dead is a Mexican tradition honoring those who have died with food, marigolds, dancing and music.

The tradition has been depicted in the 2017 animated movie “Coco” and the 2015 James Bond flick “Spectre.”

Roswell’s celebration will be Nov. 2, a Saturday, from 2 to 8 p.m. at Roswell City Hall, 38 Hill St.

There will be Mexican ballet dancers and a mariachi band performing.

Roswell will be holding its first Día de Muertos parade on Nov. 2, 2019. (Courtesy the City of Roswell)
Photo: Courtesy the City of Roswell

It’s free to enter, but there will be vendors selling food, like empanadas and tamales. Face-painting will also be free, but tips would be appreciated.

For $45 a person, there will be a tequila tasting. That includes nine tasting tokens, a souvenir cup, a mixologist who specializes in tequila cocktails and a chef making tequila-inspired meals. Buy tickets online.


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A lantern parade starts at dusk, about 7:20 p.m. “The community will gather for closing lantern parade along marigold-filled streets in downtown Roswell, led by a marching band,” the city wrote online. If you don’t bring your own lantern, you can purchase your own kit there for $5 to $25.

Marigolds are the day’s traditional flower, explains the Houston Chronicle, because the bright scent and bright colors help guide a way for the souls as they come back to enjoy their favorite foods.


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The city is also holding two-hour workshops for people to drink wine and make their own paper mâché marigolds, with the names of lost loved ones, to line the streets.

Those will be held Oct. 23 and Oct. 3 for $45 a person at The Cottage School and Webluk Farm, both in Roswell. Buy tickets online.


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Día De Los Muertos (Day of the Dead in English) is one of the world’s most misunderstood holidays. Simply because it’s celebrated within range of Halloween, and features an assortment of macabre imagery and costumes, some people assume it’s just “Mexican Halloween.” The multi-day holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died, and help support their spiritual journey. The Day of the Dead is often celebrated with ofrenda, altars hono

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