New report finds Atlanta drivers aren’t as bad as you’d think (but they still suck)

The Southern hospitality and charm Atlantans are beloved for goes right out the car window when drivers hit the city’s roads.

» RELATED: Atlanta traffic among worst in the world, study finds

In fact, if you’ve had the pleasure of trying to get from “A” to “B” anywhere in the metro, you’ve probably encountered unnecessary swerving, restless lane changes or human slugs too glued to their iPhones to notice (or care about) the 100-foot gap in front of them.

Yet, despite being home to the deadliest interstate and worst truck bottleneck in America, Atlanta doesn’t actually have the worst drivers in the country.

That honor goes to Boston, where a new study conducted by Allstate analysts found drivers get into wrecks an average of once every 3.6 years — making Bostonians 179.6 percent more prone to car or truck crashes than the average driver.

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The Allstate “Best Drivers Report” spans claims data from America’s 200 largest cities. Analysts determined the likelihood drivers in each city would experience a collision compared to the national average, which they found to be once every 10 years.

Researchers analyzed property damage claims between January 2014 to December 2015 and defined a collision as “any auto crash resulting in a property damage claim.”

» RELATED: Photos: Weird things that have snarled Atlanta traffic

Since Allstate’s auto policies represent nearly 10 percent of all American auto policies, the report’s findings show “a realistic snapshot of what’s happening on America’s roadways.”

How did Atlanta rank?

Atlanta, which has been consistently recognized as having the worst traffic in the world, didn’t even make the top 10 cities with the worst drivers in Allstate’s analysis.

In fact, the metro barely cracked the top 20.

At No. 182 on the list of the 200 largest cities, Atlanta drivers were the 19th worst in the country, getting into wrecks an average of once every 6.6 years.

» RELATED: Metro Atlanta's 10 most consistently awful traffic hotspots

Last year, Atlanta ranked 184th on the list.

Compared to the national average, Atlanta drivers are 50.5 percent more likely to experience a car or truck collision.

However, after controlling for population density and average annual precipitation, Atlanta drivers ranked 187th and 181st, respectively.

The Allstate report also included hard-braking data based on customers voluntarily enrolled in Allstate’s Drivewise telematics program during the two-year period. 

RELATED: Huh? Atlanta has one of America's lowest average commutes

Drivers in cities with fewer hard-braking events every 1,000 miles had fewer property damage claims, according to Allstate.

In Atlanta, drivers had an average of 23.7 hard-braking events every 1,000 miles compared to 9.9 in Kansas City, Kansas, home to the best drivers in America, according to Allstate.

Where are the 10 worst drivers in America?

  1. Boston, Massachusetts (3.6 years between accidents)
  2. Baltimore, Maryland (4.2 years)
  3. Worcester, Massachusetts (4.3 years)
  4. Washington, D.C. (4.3 years)
  5. Springfield, Massachusetts (5.3 years)
  6. Glendale, California (5.5 years)
  7. Providence, Rhode Island (5.7 years)
  8. Los Angeles, California (5.9 years)
  9. New Haven, Connecticut (6.1 years)
  10. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (6.1 years)

And the 10 best?

  1. Kansas City, Kansas (14.9 years between accidents)
  2. Brownsville, Texas (14.5 years)
  3. Madison, Wisconsin (12.5 years)
  4. Huntsville, Alabama (12.4 years)
  5. Cape Coral, Florida (12.2 years)
  6. Boise, Idaho (12 years)
  7. Laredo, Texas (12 years)
  8. Port St. Lucie, Florida (12 years)
  9. McAllen, Texas (11.8 years)
  10. Olathe, Kansas (11.8 years)

Allstate’s "America’s Best Drivers Report.”

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