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Deeply diverse Gwinnett still has its racial tensions

The racial evolution of Gwinnett County is an extraordinary story. Gwinnett was almost 90 percent white in 1990. Ten years ago the county “tipped” to majority minority. Ten years later, Gwinnett is 39 percent white. And in another 10 years, that percentage will decline to 29, according to one projection.

By 2050? White people will account for just 14 percent of Gwinnett’s population.

» How do you experience race in Atlanta?

This is according to data from Woods & Poole Economics Inc., a Washington D.C., firm that specializes in economic and demographic data on counties. The AJC compiled this information as part of its new RE: Race coverage, which launches officially on Thursday. An interactive graphic will enable you to track actual or projected demographic breakdowns of every Georgia county from 1990 through 2050.

With the RE: Race project, the AJC has undertaken new coverage of diversity in Georgia with the goal of fostering a respectful community conversation. In the video, members of the RE: Race team talk about race and why this coverage is so important.

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As diverse as it has become, Gwinnett still has racial tensions. Tommy Hunter, a member of the all-white county commission, caused a nationwide stir when he called U.S. Rep. John Lewis a “racist pig” in January.

At the time, Hunter’s campaign consultant, Seth Weathers, said, “If a Democrat screams racist it’s a fact. But if a Republican accuses someone of doing something racist, everyone screams that the Republican is racist.”

Nevertheless, Gwinnett remains one of the most diverse counties in the Southeast and is becoming more so.

Read the inaugural story – about the demographic evolution of Cobb County – of our RE: Race project (it will post on Thursday), and tell us how you have experienced race and ethnicity.

You are encouraged to comment on any aspect of the AJC’s race and ethnicity coverage. Commenting is moderated by AJC editors.

The RE: Race team


Ernie Suggs

AJC news reporter


Bo Emerson

AJC features and news reporter


Rosalind Bentley

AJC news reporter


Willoughby Mariano

AJC investigative reporter


Helena Oliviero

AJC features reporter


John Perry

AJC data specialist


Erica A. Hernandez

AJC multimedia journalist


Pete Corson

AJC audience specialist


María Alejandra Bastidas

Editor of MundoHispánico


Marcelo Wheelock

Senior editor of MundoHispánico


Richard Halicks

AJC senior editor


Leroy Chapman

AJC deputy managing editor

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