Cumberland could get a mixed-use development larger than SunTrust Park

A sketch of a proposed mixed-use development that would be built on more than 18 acres southeast of Cumberland Parkway and Paces Walk.
A sketch of a proposed mixed-use development that would be built on more than 18 acres southeast of Cumberland Parkway and Paces Walk.

Credit: HANDOUT

Credit: HANDOUT

The Cobb County Planning Commission will vote next week on a massive mixed-use development near Vinings including everything from senior living to a supermarket.

That vote comes at the commission’s Feb. 7 meeting where it will consider staff’s recommendation to move forward with the project.

The six-building development would span more than 18 acres southeast of Cumberland Parkway and Paces Walk.

The proposed development is a true mixed-use concept with the following spaces:

  • Apartments, 300 units (700-square-foot minimum)
  • Condos, 50 units (1,800-square-foot average)
  • Senior living, 225 units (800-square-foot average)
  • 55-and-older living, 200 units (910-square-foot average)
  • Hotel, 300 rooms (400-square-foot average)
  • Retail, 101,000 square feet (78,000 square feet of supermarket space; 23,103 square feet of general retail)

As for what supermarket will fill that space, Attorney John Moore, who is representing Kaplan Morgan Vinings Development, wouldn’t say more than “it is a national well-known brand.”

Moore said this process started about eight months ago.

The developer had to wait for school to start in order to get an accurate reading for a traffic impact study.

“It’s been delayed a long time,” he said.

The project’s only “traffic culprit” to planning officials was the intersection of Paces Ferry Road and Cumberland Parkway and its bottleneck made worse by the I-285 off-ramp, Moore said.

County planners have told the company that traffic improvements costing an estimated $800,000 are required for the project to move forward, but it’s not clear who would pay for them.

“I’ve been informed Cobb County has no money to do the improvements,” Moore said. “Whatever it costs is what’s going to be done.”

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