The nephew of a couple who owns a Buckhead estate, and a party promoter accused of violating city zoning laws were issued arrest warrants because they failed to appear for a Monday trial.

Arrest warrants issued for man tied to Buckhead mansion parties

An Atlanta judge issued an arrest warrant for a man accused of hosting unruly parties at a Buckhead mansion after the man failed to appear in court this week.

Olutosin Oduwole was scheduled to appear Monday before Chief Municipal Court Judge Christopher Portis on zoning and noise violations tied to running an illegal party house at the Garmon Road property, according to online court records. An arrest warrant was also issued for party promoter Arielle Hill who also failed to appear in court, Channel 2 Action News reported.

Oduwole’s aunt and uncle own the mansion, but he has been managing the home while they are in Nigeria.

Oduwole, 34, splits his time between New Jersey and Atlanta and said he’ll return to the city Wednesday to set a court date. In a phone conversation Tuesday, he said he plans on fighting the charges. 

“I think there is a huge misconception of there being parties there,” he said. Oduwole said there have been two parties that have “gotten out of hand” in the past two years.


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This case stems from a party hosted this summer for rapper YFN Lucci that Atlanta police had to shut down, Channel 2 reported. Oduwole said he was told the gathering would be for a small party.

“I’ve made it very clear that I wasn’t aware of that and didn’t agree to it,” he said.

A third person tied to the case, Clifton LaCour, pleaded guilty to noise ordinance and false statement to police charges. LaCour, a DJ, received a $1,000 fine and six months of unsupervised probation, Channel 2 reported. He also agreed to testify about the house parties and everyone’s roles in them.

The home has been the target of party house legislation being considered by the Atlanta City Council. The legislation would ban party houses in residential areas and better enforce existing rules. It is illegal to use a residence for commercial purposes, so by charging an entrance fee, the house parties are already illegal.

“I do feel like I’ve been a target,” Oduwole told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution of the legislation. “If someone does want to have a party in their house, there’s no law against it.”


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