Gwinnett County to improve Thompson Mill Road, Peachtree Industrial Boulevard

The Gwinnett County Board of Commissions have approved two road improvement projects. (Jenni Girtman for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)
Caption
The Gwinnett County Board of Commissions have approved two road improvement projects. (Jenni Girtman for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Credit: Jenni Girtman

Credit: Jenni Girtman

The Gwinnett Board of Commissioners announced Monday that they awarded two road improvement projects for Thompson Mill Road and Peachtree Industrial Boulevard — major thoroughfares in northwest Gwinnett County.

Omshide Construction, LLC will widen Thompson Mill Road to four lanes near the intersection of Ga. 13 and Buford Highway. Sidewalks and drainage improvements will also be implemented.

Gwinnett County and the City of Buford will fund the project, which will cost a maximum of about $1.5 million, officials said.

The second project, awarded to Archimetric Design & Construction, Inc., will add a southbound through lane along Peachtree Industrial Boulevard from Suwanee Dam to Grand Teton Parkway. Single left-turn lanes on Suwanee Dam will be converted to dual left-turn lanes and new traffic signals will be installed.

The project will cost a maximum of $2.8 million, official said.

Gwinnett Commissioner Marlene Fosque wrote in a statement to the AJC that the projects were approved after the board considered the needs of the community for an easier, faster, and safer commute.

“Surrounding businesses and large campuses will experience less traffic congestion during operating hours,” Fosque wrote. “The addition of turning lanes will also improve traffic flow through Thompson Mill Road by removing stopped and turning vehicles from through traffic, improving road safety and reducing the frequency and severity of accidents within the corridor once constructed.”

Funding for the projects will come from the county’s 2017 Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax (SPLOST) program, which funds Gwinnett County facilities and projects through a sales tax on county residents.

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