Gwinnett County sets public hearings for tax rate

Gwinnett County Board of Commissions gather for a board meeting at Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center on Tuesday June 7, 2022. (Natrice Miller / natrice.miller@ajc.com)

Credit: Natrice Miller / Natrice.Miller@ajc.com

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Gwinnett County Board of Commissions gather for a board meeting at Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center on Tuesday June 7, 2022. (Natrice Miller / natrice.miller@ajc.com)

Credit: Natrice Miller / Natrice.Miller@ajc.com

The Gwinnett County Board of Commissioners will hold three public hearings this month on a proposal to hold the general fund millage rate steady at 6.95 mills, or $6.95 per $1,000 in assessed value.

The hearings will take place in the auditorium of the Gwinnett Justice and Administration Center, 75 Langley Drive in Lawrenceville.

The dates and times are Monday, July 11, at 9 a.m. and 2 p.m., and Monday, July 18 at 6:30 p.m.

ExploreGwinnett County expects to collect more revenue with the same tax rate

State law requires commissioners to announce a property tax increase and hold hearings because keeping the millage rate the same will collect more revenue than last year. To keep revenues the same, the county said it would have to roll the rate back to 6.088 mills.

Due to rising property values, county officials have said they expect to collect about $34 million more for the general fund than they estimated when this year’s budget was developed. However, they said the county needs the money primarily for employee raises due to the tight labor market. Some of the additional revenue would also fund capital maintenance and property for a park-and-ride facility in Lawrenceville.

Commissioners will also consider separate millage rates for the police, fire and emergency services, development and code enforcement, recreation and economic development funds. The county’s total property tax rate is currently 14.71 mills, not including the rates set by cities and Gwinnett County Public Schools.

Gwinnett County offers a value offset exemption, which freezes the assessed value of eligible homes on Jan. 1 after an ownership change. Homeowners must live in the home to qualify.

About 60% of residential properties in Gwinnett have the exemption. Those homeowners will not pay more in county taxes if the millage rate remains the same. The exemption does not apply to city or school district taxes.

ExploreMore stories about Gwinnett County

Commissioners are also accepting online comments about the proposed millage rates until 9 p.m. on July 18.

The board is scheduled to vote on the tax rates during its regular meeting July 19 at 2 p.m.

The county has posted legal notices regarding the 2022 digest and property tax increase.