Beltline to start planning for key but complex section of trail in NW Atlanta

Local residents walk on an undeveloped portion of the Beltline in the Pittsburgh neighborhood in Atlanta. Curtis Compton ccompton@ajc.com

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Local residents walk on an undeveloped portion of the Beltline in the Pittsburgh neighborhood in Atlanta. Curtis Compton ccompton@ajc.com

The Atlanta Beltline will begin planning how to construct a complex portion of the mixed-use path in northwest Atlanta that is crucial to completing the 22-mile loop.

Last week, the Beltline put out a call for a qualified engineering consultant to study the northwest portion of the trail, a 4.4-mile segment that stretches from Huff Road on the Westside to the Northeast Trail at Peachtree Creek near Lindbergh. It is among the last segments of the Beltline scheduled to be completed.

“The northwest segment presents unique challenges due to existing active freight rail lines, which may not be feasible options for trail or transit alignment,” the Beltline said in a news release. This section of the trail also goes under I-75.

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This map shows the northwest portion of the Beltline (dotted blue line) that will be studied.

Credit: Courtesy/Atlanta Beltline Inc.

This map shows the northwest portion of the Beltline (dotted blue line) that will be studied.

Credit: Courtesy/Atlanta Beltline Inc.

Combined ShapeCaption
This map shows the northwest portion of the Beltline (dotted blue line) that will be studied.

Credit: Courtesy/Atlanta Beltline Inc.

Credit: Courtesy/Atlanta Beltline Inc.

The Beltline also plans to commission a feasibility study for transit along the segment this spring. The Beltline said it plans to work with rail companies CSX and Norfolk Southern and will look into “creative alternatives to assemble the real estate for this corridor.”

ExploreAtlanta just passed a new tax around the Beltline. Here’s what you need to know

Earlier this week, Beltline officials celebrated the Atlanta City Council’s passage of a tax increase for businesses and apartment complexes around the 22-mile loop that could bring in $100 million in revenue. Leaders said the additional funding from the “Special Service District” will allow the Beltline to complete the trail — including the northwest corridor — by 2029, ahead of schedule.