Ahmaud Arbery case: The charges each defendant was convicted of

All three defendants were convicted of murder in the shooting death of Ahmaud Arbery.
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All three defendants were convicted of murder in the shooting death of Ahmaud Arbery.

All three defendants faced the same nine charges in the death of Ahmaud Arbery. Here are the charges and the jury’s decision:

Travis McMichael

1. Malice murder – GUILTY

2. Felony murder – GUILTY

3. Felony murder – GUILTY

4. Felony murder – GUILTY

5. Felony murder – GUILTY

6. Aggravated assault – GUILTY

7. Aggravated assault – GUILTY

8. False imprisonment – GUILTY

9. Criminal attempt to commit a felony – GUILTY

ExploreVideo: Watch as the verdicts were read

Greg McMichael

1. Malice murder – NOT GUILTY

2. Felony murder – GUILTY

3. Felony murder – GUILTY

4. Felony murder – GUILTY

5. Felony murder – GUILTY

6. Aggravated assault – GUILTY

7. Aggravated assault – GUILTY

8. False imprisonment – GUILTY

9. Criminal attempt to commit a felony – GUILTY

William “Roddie” Bryan

1. Malice murder – NOT GUILTY

2. Felony murder – NOT GUILTY

3. Felony murder – GUILTY

4. Felony murder – GUILTY

5. Felony murder – GUILTY

6. Aggravated assault – NOT GUILTY

7. Aggravated assault – GUILTY

8. False imprisonment – GUILTY

9. Criminal attempt to commit a felony – GUILTY

ExploreKey facts and and a timeline in the Ahmaud Arbery case

What are malice murder and felony murder?

Malice Murder: An intentional murder that is willful and premeditated.

Felony Murder: A killing that occurs during the commission or attempted commission of a felony. Intent is not necessary. In this case, the underlying felonies were aggravated assault, false imprisonment and criminal attempt to commit a felony.

Federal charges are pending

The McMichaels and Bryan also face federal hate crime charges in Arbery’s death. U.S. District Judge Lisa Godbey Wood has set a trial date of Feb. 7. A federal grand jury indicted the three men on one count each of interference with civil rights and attempted kidnapping. The McMichaels are also charged with using, carrying and brandishing a firearm during a violent crime.

Federal prosecutors allege that the men “used force and threats of force to intimidate and interfere with Arbery’s right to use a public street because of his race.”

ExploreHow Georgia laws, including the old citizen's arrest statute, were changed after Ahmaud Arbery's death

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