Ahmaud Arbery case: The charges each defendant was convicted of

All three defendants faced the same nine charges in the death of Ahmaud Arbery. Here are the charges and the jury’s decision:

Travis McMichael

1. Malice murder – GUILTY

2. Felony murder – GUILTY

3. Felony murder – GUILTY

4. Felony murder – GUILTY

5. Felony murder – GUILTY

6. Aggravated assault – GUILTY

7. Aggravated assault – GUILTY

8. False imprisonment – GUILTY

9. Criminal attempt to commit a felony – GUILTY

ExploreVideo: Watch as the verdicts were read

Greg McMichael

1. Malice murder – NOT GUILTY

2. Felony murder – GUILTY

3. Felony murder – GUILTY

4. Felony murder – GUILTY

5. Felony murder – GUILTY

6. Aggravated assault – GUILTY

7. Aggravated assault – GUILTY

8. False imprisonment – GUILTY

9. Criminal attempt to commit a felony – GUILTY

William “Roddie” Bryan

1. Malice murder – NOT GUILTY

2. Felony murder – NOT GUILTY

3. Felony murder – GUILTY

4. Felony murder – GUILTY

5. Felony murder – GUILTY

6. Aggravated assault – NOT GUILTY

7. Aggravated assault – GUILTY

8. False imprisonment – GUILTY

9. Criminal attempt to commit a felony – GUILTY

ExploreKey facts and and a timeline in the Ahmaud Arbery case

What are malice murder and felony murder?

Malice Murder: An intentional murder that is willful and premeditated.

Felony Murder: A killing that occurs during the commission or attempted commission of a felony. Intent is not necessary. In this case, the underlying felonies were aggravated assault, false imprisonment and criminal attempt to commit a felony.

Federal charges are pending

The McMichaels and Bryan also face federal hate crime charges in Arbery’s death. U.S. District Judge Lisa Godbey Wood has set a trial date of Feb. 7. A federal grand jury indicted the three men on one count each of interference with civil rights and attempted kidnapping. The McMichaels are also charged with using, carrying and brandishing a firearm during a violent crime.

Federal prosecutors allege that the men “used force and threats of force to intimidate and interfere with Arbery’s right to use a public street because of his race.”

ExploreHow Georgia laws, including the old citizen's arrest statute, were changed after Ahmaud Arbery's death