Court upholds Neuman conviction in Dunwoody day care center killing

Hemy Neuman surveys the courtroom during his motion for a new trial in front of DeKalb County Judge Gregory Adams at the DeKalb County Courthouse in Decatur on July 9, 2019. (Alyssa Pointer/alyssa.pointer@ajc.com)
Hemy Neuman surveys the courtroom during his motion for a new trial in front of DeKalb County Judge Gregory Adams at the DeKalb County Courthouse in Decatur on July 9, 2019. (Alyssa Pointer/alyssa.pointer@ajc.com)

Credit: � 2019 Cox Media Group.

Credit: � 2019 Cox Media Group.

The Georgia Supreme Court on Monday upheld the murder conviction against Hemy Neuman in the Dunwoody day care center killing.

In its opinion, the court unanimously upheld Neuman’s convictions of murder and illegal firearm possession in his second trial, held in 2016.

Neuman was initially found guilty but mentally ill in a sensational 2012 trial. But those convictions were reversed because the trial judge wrongly allowed into evidence records of two mental health experts who examined Neuman — documents that should have been protected under attorney-client privilege, the state Supreme Court said in a 2015 opinion.

Shortly after 9 a.m. on Nov. 18, 2010, just after dropping off his son, entrepreneur Rusty Sneiderman was walking to his car outside a Dunwoody day care center. He was suddenly confronted by Neuman, who fatally shot Sneiderman four to five times in the neck and torso.

In his first trial, Neuman, a former GE Energy executive, said he’d had an affair with Sneiderman’s wife. He also acknowledged planning Sneiderman’s murder by buying a disguise, carrying out the killing and throwing the murder weapon into a lake. He unsuccessfully sought to get the jury to find him not guilty by reason of insanity.

In his second trial, Neuman tried the same strategy but this jury returned unqualified guilty verdicts, and Neuman was sentenced to life in prison without parole.

At that trial, the DeKalb County jury was “authorized to reject Neuman’s insanity defense and find no mental illness based on its assessment of the credibility of the witnesses and of any conflicts in the evidence,” said the Monday state Supreme Court opinion, written by Justice Charles Bethel.

Andrea Sneiderman, who has insisted she was never romantically involved with Neuman, initially was accused of helping Neuman kill her husband. After murder charges against her were dropped, she was later found guilty of perjury and hindering the apprehension of a killer. She was released from prison in 2014 after serving 10 months of a five-year sentence.

Andrea Sneiderman leaves DeKalb County Superior Court on August 20, 2013, after being sentenced by Judge Gregory A. Adams. He gave Sneiderman 5 years with credit for time served during her house arrest. A jury found Sneiderman guilty on several counts of perjury and obstruction in connection with the death of her husband, Rusty. A murder charge against her was dismissed on July 26. (KENT D. JOHNSON / AJC file photo)
Andrea Sneiderman leaves DeKalb County Superior Court on August 20, 2013, after being sentenced by Judge Gregory A. Adams. He gave Sneiderman 5 years with credit for time served during her house arrest. A jury found Sneiderman guilty on several counts of perjury and obstruction in connection with the death of her husband, Rusty. A murder charge against her was dismissed on July 26. (KENT D. JOHNSON / AJC file photo)

Credit: KENT D. JOHNSON / AJC

Credit: KENT D. JOHNSON / AJC

In Other News