Dad’s Garage offers online entertainment amid coronavirus

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The Springs Cinema & Taphouse and Stage Door Players are among local businesses grappling with what the coronavirus pandemic will mean for local theaters of all kinds.

While the online programming is available for free, an anonymous donor will match donations made during a Friday night virtual show

Like most theaters and places of entertainment throughout Atlanta and beyond, Dad’s Garage Theatre is trying to find ways to adapt to a world of social distancing and shelter-in-place orders.

The theater company has looked to online options to keep the city laughing.

"Things are crazy right now, but we have some good news! There will be Dad's Garage digital programming to keep you company every day of the week," a post on Dad's website reads. "It's gonna be a challenging stretch, so please help us out by donating, subscribing, and tuning into our new Twitch content."

On its Twitch Channel, Dad’s Garage has been offering free entertainment. At 8 p.m. on April 17, it will show “Song of the Living Dead.”

Dad’s is also asking people to consider making a donation, if they are able, to help keep the theater company afloat amid uncertain times. Donations will be matched by an anonymous donor, Matthew Terrell, communications director for Dad’s Garage, told Atlanta InTown.

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According to the newspaper, the show from Dad’s archives is “a silly musical about zombies taking over the world.” Some of the cast members and show creators will also be chatting live on the Twitch feed.

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Today on Twitch! #dadsgarage

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Along with other venues throughout the city, Dad's Garage co-signed a letter to theater goers asking them for their support amid the outbreak.

“We can make it through this together, but local theatres need your support to help weather this storm,” the letter — written by Terrell —read in part.

“Theatres are facing a major loss in revenue because of this. In addition to the impact on our organizations, the performers, artisans, and administrative staff of local theatres are also likely to have personal financial struggles through the coming weeks.”