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Genealogists must find creative ways to continue research

040316 ROSWELL, GA: Names and dates line the voluminous records at the Church of Latter Day Saints Family History Center, where people come to research their family's genealogy. Family History Center at 500 Norcross Street in Roswell. For Helen Cauley feature on Geneaology - Family Trees. (Parker C. Smith/Special)
040316 ROSWELL, GA: Names and dates line the voluminous records at the Church of Latter Day Saints Family History Center, where people come to research their family's genealogy. Family History Center at 500 Norcross Street in Roswell. For Helen Cauley feature on Geneaology - Family Trees. (Parker C. Smith/Special)

Credit: Special

Credit: Special

With the pandemic continuing and the uncertainty of archives and libraries reopening anytime soon, genealogists need to think of other research options.

Signing up for a webinar, podcast, online lecture or conference is one way to keep learning. You could order a book or two to help your research or subscribe to a magazine that would offer a year’s worth of articles and ideas. Joining the National Genealogical Society, or a local or state society, is one way to keep up.

Most local groups are still continuing to publish their journals/quarterlies with articles of interest. Many are putting their monthly meetings online. You could hire a professional genealogist to help solve a particular problem or give you a report to guide you in the future. For those libraries or archives that are answering questions online, ask a specific question of the reference staff to help solve a mystery.

Using the great digitized newspaper sites for the state in question can be a great help, as there is always something to find in the newspapers. FamilySearch.org set late this year as its goal to have all the county and state records on microfilm digitized and online for free, so keep checking. It has records from all over the world.

South Carolina Archives reopens with restrictions.

The South Carolina Archives reopened July 15 with masks and social distancing required. See more COVID-19 guidelines on its website at scdah.sc.gov.

The website contains a lot of digitized records and indexes worth checking before visiting or in lieu of a visit. Many Georgia genealogy rooms have a wealth of South Carolina publications.

For more, check the website or call the research room desk at 803-896-6104 or 6105.

The archives’ hours are 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. It’s closed Sunday and Monday.

Houston’s Clayton Genealogy Library offers Zoom programs

Houston’s Clayton Library Friends and Clayton Library are presenting “Genealogy Face 2 Face” via Zoom on Thursday afternoons at 2 p.m. CDT.

It is a roundtable discussion for members and the public, with a focus on research sources and a “Chat Log” summary afterward. On the third Thursday of each month, a Clayton Library staff member will join in.

Registration is required for an invite to join in. See claytonlibraryfriends.org.

Contact Kenneth H. Thomas, Jr., P. O. Box 901, Decatur, GA 30031 or kenthomasongenealogy.com.