Jane Fonda’s outlook on aging and feeling young at 84

Oscar-winning actress Jane Fonda isn’t letting turning 85 later this year slow her down.

The actress and activist appeared with co-star and pal Lily Tomlin on CBS Sunday Morning over the weekend. They discussed the final season of their Netflix show, “Grace and Frankie” where the pair celebrate aging and life after retirement.

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“You can be really old at 60 and you can be really young at 85,” Fonda said on CBS Sunday Morning.

Throughout her life, Fonda has faced several health conditions such as osteoporosis, which caused her to get two hip and knee replacements, cancer and bulimia. Yet, she feels optimistic about aging, savoring each day as it comes.

“I didn’t think I’d ever live this long — or feel that I’m whole or getting whole. I feel very intentional about realizing that it’s up to me how this last part of my life goes,” Fonda told British Vogue.

Her secret to staying young at 85 can be found in her lifestyle. Her activism “is a great antidote to depression and despair,” she told Who What Wear, as she feels less helpless by creating an impact and using her platform to help change the world.

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“I think a lot of us are carrying despair in our bodies, consciously or unconsciously, because we know what’s happening to the climate, to the ecosystems — and we mourn. It’s an existential sadness, and activism is what kind of leads me to that.”

Known for her exercise tapes that launched in the 1980s, Fonda still keeps an active lifestyle and incorporates daily exercise in her routine. She walks every day, and does resistance training and yoga. She also meditates, maintains a healthy sleep schedule, and has a rich skin-care routine. The star does not let aging stop her from doing what she wants.

“The mistake that so many people make is that if they can’t do what they once did, then they don’t do anything. Big mistake,” Fonda told Express.

“We can allow our various infirmities to define us, or we can say to ourselves, ‘I want to stay independent as long as possible. I want to be able to sit on the floor and play with my grandchildren. I want to carry at least some of my own luggage and not take 15 minutes to get out of a car.’”

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