Wiley Miller of the cartoon strip, Non Sequitur, will discuss political cartoons and how this medium is used to make a statement especially in this year’s crazy election at a special dinner at Serenbe Sunday.CONTRIBUTED

How to dine with cartoonist Wiley Miller at Serenbe this weekend

Wiley Miller of the cartoon strip, Non Sequitur, will discuss political cartoons and how this medium is used to make a statement especially in this year’s crazy election at a special dinner at Serenbe Sunday.

The dinner is open to the public and is an intimate, seated, 50-person dinner under the stars at the Art Farm at Serenbe

(Art Farm Serenbe, 10455 Atlanta-Newnan Road Chattahoochee Hills) which brings artists and art supporters together for dialogue and engagement along with great food.

Tickets are $85 per person and a small number are still available for the dinner at 6 p.m. Sunday.

About Wiley Miller, as provided by Serenbe:

Wiley Miller has always had one simple goal: “Produce the funniest, best-drawn cartoon possible, regardless of theme, subject matter or setting.” Non Sequitur has accomplished that and more: A hit with fans of all ages, the strip is distributed to more than 700 newspapers. Wiley is the recipient of the Rueben Award, naming him Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year by the National Cartoonists Society in 2014, the most prestigious prize in cartooning. In addition to that, Non Sequitur has won four National Cartoonists Society divisional awards, and Wiley was the first cartoonist to be presented a divisional award after only one year in syndication. He’s the only one ever to win in both the comic strip and comic panel categories.

After a stint at the Santa Rosa Press Democrat in California, he created his first syndicated strip, Fenton, in 1982. He returned to editorial cartooning three years later, joining the staff of the San Francisco Examiner. In 1988, Wiley was named Best Editorial Cartoonist by the California Newspaper Publishers Association. He won the prestigious Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for editorial cartooning in 1991.

A native of California, Wiley and his family now live in Georgia in the community of Serenbe.

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