Trump ready to ease Coronavirus restrictions on some of US

A week after instituting a 15 day period where he called on Americans to drastically limit their social interactions in hopes of holding back the spread of the Coronavirus in the U.S., President Donald Trump made very clear on Monday that he's ready to lift those restrictions in some areas in coming days, arguing the moves were exacting too heavy a toll on the American economy.

"Our country wasn't built to be shutdown," the President declared at a White House briefing on the Coronavirus.

"We cannot let the cure be worse than the problem itself," Mr. Trump added.

While repeatedly saying Governors would be allowed to make their own policy choices, the President made clear that areas with only a handful of cases should not see their economies brought to a halt.

"We are not going to let it turn into a long lasting financial problem," he added.

Even as he confirmed press reports that he was leaning against the overall advice of federal health experts, the President again made clear he needs Congress to also act on an economic rescue package for industries hit hard by the virus.

"Why close 100 percent of the country?" the President said to reporters, as he endorsed efforts to give the economy a boost.

"We are going to save American workers and we're going to save them quickly," Mr. Trump added, urging Senators to act quickly on an economic stimulus plan.

"They don't have a choice," the President said. "They have to make a deal."

One sticking point in negotiations has been on oversight for the $500 billion in emergency loans which could be offered to larger industries.

Democrats have been pressing for immediate oversight, so that the Congress - and the public - know which companies are getting aid, and how much.

Asked about that by reporters, the President indicated he was not on board with the calls from Democrats.

"I'll be the oversight," Mr. Trump said. "We're going to make good deals."

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