A look at the athletes and sports figures who have died in 2021:

JUNE 8 - Jim Fassel, the 1997 NFL coach of the year, guided the Giants from 1997 to 2003, posting a 58-53-1 record. He was 2-3 in the postseason, including a 34-7 loss to the Baltimore Ravens in the Super Bowl in February 2001. He was on coaching staffs at Denver, Oakland, Arizona and Baltimore, as well as head coach at the University of Utah. He also helmed the United Football League’s Las Vegas Locomotives. Fassel was 71.

MAY 28 - Mark Eaton, an NBA center who spent his entire 11-seasons with the Utah Jazz, remains the league leader in blocks per game with 3.51. Eaton was twice named the NBA defensive player of the year. The 1989 All-Star has his No. 53 jersey retired by the Jazz. He was 64.

MAY 11 - Colt Brennan, former quarterback at Hawaii, finished third in the 2007 Heisman Trophy balloting. Brennan faced the Georgia Bulldogs in the 2008 Sugar Bowl. He was drafted by Washington in the sixth round of the NFL draft in 2008, but he never played a regular season game in two seasons. He was 37.

Kentucky guard Terrence Clarke (5) shoots over Georgia Tech guard Jordan Usher (4) in the first half of the Pit Boss Grills Holiday Hoopsgiving Sunday, Dec. 6, 2020, at State Farm Arena in Atlanta. (Hyosub Shin / Hyosub.Shin@ajc.com)
Kentucky guard Terrence Clarke (5) shoots over Georgia Tech guard Jordan Usher (4) in the first half of the Pit Boss Grills Holiday Hoopsgiving Sunday, Dec. 6, 2020, at State Farm Arena in Atlanta. (Hyosub Shin / Hyosub.Shin@ajc.com)

Credit: HYOSUB SHIN / AJC

Credit: HYOSUB SHIN / AJC

APRIL 22 - Terrence Clarke, a freshman guard at Kentucky, who had declared for the 2021 NBA Draft. Clarke averaged 9.6 points in just eight games with the Wildcats. He was 19.

MARCH 27 - Howard Schnellenberger played for Paul “Bear” Bryant at Kentucky and embarked on a legendary coaching career of his own, coaching under Bryant at Alabama and NFL Hall of Famers George Allen and Don Shula. Schnellenberger led Miami to its first national championship. He revitalized the program at Louisville. He built the football program at Florida Atlantic. He won 158 games at four colleges and coached the Baltimore Colts (4-13) for parts of two seasons. He was 87.

MARCH 25 - Stan Albeck was an assistant coach on Lenny Wilken’s Atlanta Hawks coaching staff for three seasons. Albeck amassed a 307-267 record as head coach with the Spurs, Cavaliers and Nets during a long NBA career that included a one-year stint with the Chicago Bulls during Michael Jordan’s second year in the league. Albeck was 89.

MARCH 22 - Elgin Baylor was a Hall of Fame basketball player who served two decades as general manager of the L.A. Clippers. The top overall pick in 1958 by the Minneapolis Lakers, Baylor won MVP and Rookie of the Year honors in 1959. An 11-time All-Star, Baylor averaged 27.4 points and 11.4 rebounds. He appeared in eight NBA finals and was a member of the 1972 Lakers team that won a championship. He was 86.

MARCH 13 - Boxer “Marvelous” Marvin Hagler, a southpaw, defended his middleweight belt in 12 bouts for six years and seven months, losing to Sugar Ray Leonard by split decision in 1987. Hagler retired nearly two years later and become an actor in Italy. He was 66.

Philadelphia Phillies reliever Rheal Cormier throws against the Arizona Diamondbacks in the ninth inning Friday, April 30, 2004, in Philadelphia.  The Phillies won, 4-0. (AP Photo/George Widman)
Philadelphia Phillies reliever Rheal Cormier throws against the Arizona Diamondbacks in the ninth inning Friday, April 30, 2004, in Philadelphia. The Phillies won, 4-0. (AP Photo/George Widman)

Credit: AP

Credit: AP

MARCH 8 - Left-handed Rheal Cormier spent 16 seasons in the majors pitching for six teams. He was 71-64 with two saves and a 4.03 ERA with St. Louis, Boston, Montreal, Philadelphia and Cincinnati. He was a two-time Olympian, playing for his native Canada in two games in 1988 and 2008. He was 53.

FEB. 25 - Darrius Johnson was a defensive back on two Denver Broncos Super Bowl winning teams. A fourth-round pick out of Oklahoma in 1996, Johnson appeared in 67 NFL games over five seasons. He was 47.

FEB. 18 - Juan Pizarro was a pitcher for 18 seasons in the majors who got his start with the Milwaukee Braves in 1957, the year they won a World Series. A two-time All-Star, he went 131-105 with a 3.43 ERA for eight teams, including the Braves, White Sox, Pirates, Red Sox and Cubs. He was 84.

FEB. 15 - Vincent Jackson spent 12 years a wide receiver in the NFL with the Buccaneers and Chargers. A three-time Pro Bowl Selection, Jackson surpassed the 1,000-receiving yard mark six times in a career that stretched from 2005 to 2016. He was 38.

JAN. 29 - John Chaney, the longtime basketball coach of Temple University, led the Owls to 17 trips to the NCAA Tournament - five to the Elite Eight - winning 741 games at the Philadelphia school and Division II Cheney, where he won a national title. He was 89.

A photograph of Henry "Hank" Aaron, longtime Atlanta Braves player and Hall of Famer, sits near his casket during funeral services Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2021, at Friendship Baptist Church in Atlanta. (Kevin D. Liles/Atlanta Braves)
A photograph of Henry "Hank" Aaron, longtime Atlanta Braves player and Hall of Famer, sits near his casket during funeral services Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2021, at Friendship Baptist Church in Atlanta. (Kevin D. Liles/Atlanta Braves)

Credit: Kevin D. Liles/Atlanta Braves

Credit: Kevin D. Liles/Atlanta Braves

JAN. 22 - Hank Aaron spent nearly all of his 23-year Hall of Fame career with the Braves. He inspired Black Americans by overcoming intense racism in his pursuit of baseball’s home run record. The one time baseball’s all-time home run king, finished his career with 755 homers. He retired as the all-time RBI leader (2,297) also racked up the most extra-base hits (1,477) and finished in the top three for at-bats (second with 12,364), runs (second with 2,174 in a tie with Babe Ruth), games (third with 3,298) and hits (third with 3,771). He was inducted into Cooperstown in 1982. He was 86.

JAN. 18 - Don Sutton was a Hall of Fame pitcher who broadcast Atlanta Braves games on TV and radio for almost three decades. Sutton won 324 games with an ERA of 3.26 for five major league teams from 1966-88. He broadcast Braves games for all but two years from 1989-2018. He earned a spot in baseball’s Hall of Fame in 1998. His 3,574 strikeouts are the seventh-most all-time. He was 75.

Don Sutton was a longtime member of the Braves' broadcast team. (Curtis Compton / AJC)
Don Sutton was a longtime member of the Braves' broadcast team. (Curtis Compton / AJC)

Credit: Curtis Compton

Credit: Curtis Compton

JAN. 18 - Tony Ingle was a basketball coach who produced winning teams at the high school and college level in Georgia during a career that spanned three decades. He led Cherokee High to a state title game appearance in 1982 before moving to college ranks at Gordon College, Alabama-Huntsville and BYU. He was most successful at Kennesaw State, where he led the Owls to three Division II national tournament appearances from 2003-05, winning the title in 2004. In 2013, he coached his alma mater, Dalton State (formerly Dalton Junior College), to an NAIA Division I championship. Ingle was 68.

JAN. 8 - Tommy Lasorda was a baseball Hall of Fame manager who guided the Los Angeles Dodgers to two World Series titles and later became an ambassador for the sport. Lasorda spent 71 years with the Dodgers, working as a player, scout, manager and front office executive dating to their roots in Brooklyn. He compiled a 1,599-1,439 record, won World Series titles in 1981 and ’88, four National League pennants and eight division titles while serving as manager from 1977 to 1996. He was 93.

JAN. 2 - Paul Westphal was a Hall of Fame basketball player who won a title with the Boston Celtics in 1974 and later coached the Phoenix Suns to the 1993 NBA Finals. Westphal, a five-time All-Star guard played 12 seasons with Boston, Phoenix, Seattle and New York. He went on a successful coaching career in Phoenix, Seattle, Dallas, Sacramento and Brooklyn. In the college ranks, he coached Grand Canyon College to the 1988 NAIA title and led Pepperdine to a NCAA Tournament appearance. He would later be an analyst on L.A. Lakers and Clipper broadcasts. He was 70.

JAN. 1 - Floyd Little was a Hall of Fame running back who starred at Syracuse and for the Denver Broncos. During his nine-year pro career, Little rushed for 6,323 yards and 43 touchdowns and caught 215 passes for 2,418 yards and nine TDs. He had the most all-purpose yards in pro football and ranked second only to O.J. Simpson in yards rushing over his career. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1983 and the Pro Football Hall in 2010. He was 78.

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