Braves’ Ron Washington a candidate for Padres’ managerial opening

Atlanta Braves' Ozzie Albies, left, rounds the bases past third base coach Ron Washington after hitting a solo home run during the seventh inning of the team's baseball game against the Washington Nationals, Friday, Sept. 13, 2019, in Washington. Atlanta won 5-0. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

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Atlanta Braves' Ozzie Albies, left, rounds the bases past third base coach Ron Washington after hitting a solo home run during the seventh inning of the team's baseball game against the Washington Nationals, Friday, Sept. 13, 2019, in Washington. Atlanta won 5-0. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

The Braves credit their experienced coaching staff for much of their success across the past two seasons. Inevitably, other teams will take notice.

Third-base coach Ron Washington is a strong candidate to fill the Padres’ managerial opening, as first reported by FanRag’s Jon Heyman. Washington interviewed with the Padres on Friday, according to the San Diego Union-Tribune.

Washington, 67, has been part of manager Brian Snitker’s staff for the past three seasons. He’s often credited for his defensive work with the Braves’ infielders. He’s commonly praised for his tight relationships with players, exemplary work ethic and boundless energy.

Washington managed the Rangers from 2007-14, compiling a 664-611 mark and guiding the team to back-to-back World Series berths in 2010-11. Padres general manager A.J. Preller was with the Rangers’ front office over that time, creating at least some level of familiarity.

The Padres have done “extensive research” on Washington’s background and feel comfortable with what they found, according to The Union-Tribune. Washington resigned from his Rangers position after the 2014 season, citing the need to spend time with his wife and family after an extramarital affair. He had tested positive for cocaine in 2009, but stayed on as Texas’ manager.

San Diego is considering several options – with experience a priority – to take over their young-but-talented team. Washington has a history of developing young talent, which likely holds great appeal to an organization on the cusp of seeing the fruits of its rebuild.

It would be a loss for the Braves, who’ve benefited from Washington’s charisma and leadership especially over the past two seasons in which the team won the National League East.